Blog Grammar Rules WSP Meaning: What Does It Mean and Stand For?

WSP Meaning: What Does It Mean and Stand For?

Krystal N. Craiker

Krystal N. Craiker

Author and Freelance Writer

Published May 27, 2022

WSP meaning Title

WSP is an abbreviation word often used in text messaging or on social media to mean “what’s up?”

Let’s take a look at this common internet slang term in more depth.

Contents:
  1. What Does WSP Stand For?
  2. WSP Meaning
  3. Examples of WSP Used in Sentences

What Does WSP Stand For?

Usually, WSP means “what’s up?” but it can occasionally mean other things as well.

WSP meaning

Here are some other things that WSP can stand for:

  • Water and sanitation program
  • Web service provider
  • WhatsApp
  • Working Steam Pressure
  • White Skin Privilege
  • Wireless Session Protocol
  • World Solar Programme
  • Westport (Amtrak station code)
  • Water Supply Point
  • Windows Service Pack
  • Waspam Airport, Nicaragua (airport code)
  • Weapon Support Processor
  • Wheel Slip Protection / Wheel Slide Protection
  • Washington State Patrol
  • Widespread panic

The context is important when determining what the WSP abbreviation stands for. For example, if you’re in a social justice setting, WSP probably means “white skin privilege” instead of “wireless session protocol.”

However, most of the time, the WSP abbreviation is a slang term for “what’s up?”

WSP Meaning

The most common WSP definition is “what’s up,” and it’s used in texting and social media.

“What’s up?” is an informal way to ask how someone is and what they’re doing. Typically, the appropriate response is “nothing much” or “not much,” which can both be abbreviated to NM.

You might think it makes more sense to abbreviate “what’s up” as WU, by using the initial letters of the word. So, why is WSP the abbreviation?

When it’s said informally, the words “what’s up” can run together and sound like “wassup.”

In 1999, Budweiser Beer ran a commercial in the United States with people repeatedly saying, “wassup.” The ad ran for three years and went viral in the early stages of the internet.

“Wassup” became a slang term in its own right. The abbreviation WSP is a shortened form of this old meme.

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Does WSP Mean the Same Thing in Text, Snapchat, and Other Social Media Platforms?

It doesn’t matter where you’re messaging: WSP means the same thing.

It’s commonly used in text messaging and on internet-based messaging apps such as Snapchat, WhatsApp, and Facebook Messenger.

You might also see WSP used in social media posts, but it’s less common there. It’s more likely to be used in conversations between two or three people.

WSP, like its meaning, is a very informal term. You should avoid using it in business or other formal settings.

Instead, use it in casual online conversations with friends and close family members.

When you should use WSP

If you need help detecting and removing informal words and abbreviations, you can use several of ProWritingAid’s reports.

You can use the Acronym Report to locate all of the abbreviations, initialisms, and acronyms in your writing.

You can set your document goals in the ProWritingAid editor to “business,” and it will tell you how closely your writing matches a business writing style.

ProWritingAid's Business documet types

Finally, ProWritingAid has a new Paraphrase tool to help you find new ways of saying things.

This is useful if you’re struggling to make your writing sound more formal. It might suggest saying, “How are you doing?” instead of “What’s up?”

Examples of WSP Used in Sentences

Now, let’s take a look at how you might use WSP in sentences. Below is an example of a texting conversation between two friends.

Friend 1: Hey man WSP

Friend 2: NM bro just studying for that bio final

Friend 1: oh lame. u wanna grab a bite later?

Friend 2: sure i need a break from these notes lol

You can see that Friend 1 used WSP to ask his friend what he was doing with the intent of inviting him out.

Friend 2 gave a customary response, with NM meaning “not much.” Of course, he was up to “much,” as he was studying for an exam.

This is the typical social norm for conversations when someone asks “what’s up?”

Let’s look at another example.

Friend 1: WSP it’s been forever lol

Friend 2: Hey not much. WBU?

Friend 1: same. u still working at McDonald’s?

Friend 2: nah, they don’t pay enough. i work on campus now in the library

In this case, WSP is the greeting. Friend 2 responded that they’re not up to much. They also reciprocated the question by asking WBU or “what about you?”

It’s considered polite to ask what someone else is doing, even if they don’t actually answer the question in a meaningful way.

Often, WSP is more of a greeting than an actual request for information.

While you should avoid using WSP in formal settings, it’s helpful to know the meaning of internet slang like this when you see it.


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Krystal N. Craiker

Krystal N. Craiker

Author and Freelance Writer

Krystal N. Craiker is an author and freelance writer. She is the author of the Scholars of Elandria fantasy series. When she isn't writing, you can find her playing board games and volunteering. Krystal lives in Texas with her husband and two adorable dogs. Visit her website or follow her on Instagram.

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