The Grammar GuideSpellingWhat is the difference between 'aloud' and 'allowed'?

What is the difference between 'aloud' and 'allowed'?

What is the difference between 'aloud' and 'allowed'?

The words aloud and allowed are often confused because they have the same pronunciation but different meanings. We'll explain the difference.

Allowed means gave permission to, permitted when used as a verb.

Aloud means with a loud voice, or great noise; loudly; audibly when used as an adverb.

A good way to remember the difference is Allowed is the past tense form of Allow.

Out of the two words, 'allowed' is the most common. It appears about 10 times more frequently than 'aloud'.



Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings. These words are easy to confuse.

Allowed is the past tense and past participle of the verb "allow." It means "permitted, granted to someone, gave permission to, or accepted."

Aloud is an adverb that means "audibly or out loud."

Is the correct expression '" she said aloud' or '" she said allowed'?

The right expression is '" she said aloud'. These phrases are often confused because they have the same pronunciation but different meanings.

Is the correct phrase '" he said aloud' or '" he said allowed'?

The correct phrase is '" he said aloud'. These phrases are often confused because they are homophones.

What's the correct phrase 'winced nor cried aloud' or 'winced nor cried allowed'?

The right expression is 'winced nor cried aloud'. These phrases are often confused because they have the same pronunciation but different meanings.

Should it be 'dank gardens cry aloud' or 'dank gardens cry allowed'?

You should use 'dank gardens cry aloud'. These phrases are often confused because they have the same pronunciation but different meanings.

Should I use 'said aloud , "' or 'said allowed , "'?

The correct phrase is 'said aloud , "'. These phrases are often confused because they sound similar.

Which is right 'should be allowed to' or 'should be aloud to'?

The correct phrase is 'should be allowed to'. These phrases are often confused because they sound similar.

Is the right expression 'not be allowed to' or 'not be aloud to'?

The right phrase is 'not be allowed to'. These phrases are often confused because they sound the same.

Should I use 'to be allowed to' or 'to be aloud to'?

The correct expression is 'to be allowed to'. These phrases are often confused because they sound the same.

Which is right 'were not allowed to' or 'were not aloud to'?

You should use 'were not allowed to'. These phrases are often confused because they sound the same.

Should it be 'had been allowed to' or 'had been aloud to'?

The correct phrase is 'had been allowed to'. These phrases are often confused because of their similar sound.

Some synonyms of aloud are: audible, out loud, vocal.

Some synonyms of allowed are: allotted, given, permitted, granted.

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The definitions in this article were adapted from Wiktionary.

Dictionary Definition of aloudDictionary Definition of allowed

Examples of aloud in a sentence

Aloud, she said, “I got caught in the rain on my way here, and, well, look!
- In the night room: a novel by Peter Straub
When the boy shook his head, his tutor laughed aloud.
- Ship of magic by Robin Hobb
Cogan isn’t sure whether he’s talking to him or just thinking aloud.
- Knife Music by David Carnoy
She began screaming the words aloud.
- Where Heaven Begins by Bittner
She hadn’t planned to say this aloud, but the words just came out.
- Villain by Shūichi Yoshida; Philip Gabriel

Examples of allowed in a sentence

Their leader allowed himself a certain amount of satisfaction.
- The wandering fire by Guy Gavriel Kay
Sookin Sin [he allowed himself the peasant obscenity], son-of-a-bitch, look at the record!
- From Russia with love: a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming
The does-he-read test was the only test she required the men she allowed into her life to pass.
- Nothing gold can stay by Dana Stabenow
Therese was allowed to ask three questions per reading session.
- The Replacement Child by Christine Barber
I’m surprised Blair allowed him near Cnothan.
- Death of an Outsider by M. C. Beaton

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