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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-02 00:00

Character Trait: Artistic

Character Trait Artistic

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The artistic character trait refers to an individual's creativity, imagination, and ability to express themselves through various forms of art such as painting, drawing, writing, music, dance, and more. People with this trait tend to have a strong appreciation for beauty, and they often see the world in a unique and imaginative way. They are inspired by their surroundings, emotions, and experiences, and they have a natural talent for turning those inspirations into works of art.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being artistic
  2. Behaviors associated with being artistic
  3. Attitudes associated with being artistic
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being artistic
  5. Emotions associated with being artistic
  6. Facial expressions associated with being artistic
  7. Body language associated with being artistic
  8. Behaviors associated with being artistic
  9. Growth and evolution of artistic characters
  10. Stereotypes of artistic characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being artistic
  12. Positives of being artistic
  13. Verbal expressions of artistic characters
  14. Relationships of artistic characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are artistic
  16. Writing exercises for writing artistic characters

Possible causes of being artistic

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • A willingness to take risks and explore new ideas
  • A natural curiosity and openness to new experiences
  • A desire to express oneself through artistic mediums, such as writing, painting, sculpting, or performing
  • An ability to think abstractly and see the world in a unique way
  • A high level of sensitivity and emotional depth
  • A tendency to be introspective and reflective
  • A need for self-expression and individuality
  • An appreciation for the complexity and depth of human emotions
  • A deep appreciation for beauty, aesthetics, and creativity

For detailed feedback on artistic characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fictional story assessment.

Behaviors associated with being artistic

You may be able to show your character's trait of artistic by using these.

  • Engaging in creative activities like painting, drawing, sculpting, or writing
  • Being open-minded and willing to experiment with new ideas
  • Having a strong imagination and being able to visualize things in a unique way
  • Paying attention to detail and striving for perfection in one's work
  • Taking risks and being unafraid to break from conventions or try something new
  • Being passionate and dedicated to one's craft
  • Constantly seeking out new challenges and opportunities for growth
  • Observing the world around oneself and finding inspiration in everyday life
  • Expressing oneself through various forms of art, such as music, dance, or theater

Attitudes associated with being artistic

You may be able to show artistic through their attitudes.

  • A sensitivity to emotions and the human experience, often leading to deep empathy and compassion
  • A focus on aesthetics and beauty, often with a keen eye for detail
  • Open-mindedness and willingness to explore new perspectives and ideas
  • A strong desire to create and express oneself through various art forms
  • A willingness to take risks and experiment with different techniques and mediums
  • A strong sense of individuality and a desire to express one's unique voice and perspective
  • A tendency to think outside the box and challenge conventional norms and expectations

Thoughts and struggles associated with being artistic

Here are some ideas for things your artistic character may think or struggle with.

  • Balancing the desire for creative expression with the need for financial stability
  • Experiencing a range of intense emotions, including joy, frustration, and despair, when creating art
  • Constantly questioning the value and purpose of their creative work
  • Struggling with self-doubt and imposter syndrome
  • Feeling torn between the desire to create for themselves and the pressure to produce work that is commercially successful
  • Wrestling with the fear of rejection and criticism from others
  • Struggling with creative blocks and periods of low motivation
  • Striving to maintain authenticity and originality in their work while also wanting to appeal to a wider audience
  • Battling feelings of inadequacy and comparing themselves to others in their field

Emotions associated with being artistic

Here are some ideas for emotions your artistic character may experience.

  • Expressive
  • Passionate
  • Eccentric
  • Creative
  • Intuitive
  • Imaginative
  • Sensitive
  • Empathetic
  • Visionary

Facial expressions associated with being artistic

Here are some facial expressions your artistic character may exhibit.

  • A quizzical or questioning expression
  • An intense or focused stare
  • A pensive or contemplative look
  • A wistful or nostalgic expression
  • A slight smile indicating pleasure or satisfaction
  • Raised eyebrows showing interest or curiosity
  • Dreamy or far-off gaze
  • A furrowed brow indicating concentration or contemplation

Body language associated with being artistic

Here is some body language your artistic character may exhibit.

  • A tendency to use colorful or poetic language
  • A natural ability to move gracefully or fluidly
  • A tendency to fidget or play with objects
  • A tendency to lean in and engage with others
  • Frequent hand gestures while speaking
  • A posture that is relaxed and open
  • An expressive and animated facial expression
  • A tendency to use their body to express emotions
  • An interest in fashion or unique clothing choices

For detailed feedback on artistic characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fictional story assessment.

Behaviors associated with being artistic

Here are some behaviors your artistic character may exhibit.

  • Having a strong imagination and being able to visualize things in a unique way
  • Taking risks and being unafraid to break from conventions or try something new
  • Observing the world around oneself and finding inspiration in everyday life
  • Expressing oneself through various forms of art, such as music, dance, or theater
  • Constantly seeking out new challenges and opportunities for growth
  • Engaging in creative activities like painting, drawing, sculpting, or writing
  • Being open-minded and willing to experiment with new ideas
  • Paying attention to detail and striving for perfection in one's work
  • Being passionate and dedicated to one's craft

Growth and evolution of artistic characters

Here are some ways that your artistic character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Learning to handle criticism and rejection in a constructive way
  • Balancing their artistic passions with other responsibilities and relationships
  • Overcoming self-doubt and gaining confidence in their abilities
  • Exploring new mediums or techniques to expand their artistic repertoire
  • Evolving their artistic style or voice over time through experimentation and reflection
  • Learning to trust others and collaborate on creative projects
  • Discovering new sources of inspiration and motivation
  • Developing a greater sense of empathy and understanding for other artists and their work
  • Confronting and overcoming creative blocks or burnout

Stereotypes of artistic characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical artistic character like these examples.

  • The "flaky" artist who can't commit or follow through on projects
  • The "tortured artist" who is always suffering for their art
  • The "bohemian" who is always living on the edge and disregarding social norms
  • The "copycat" who lacks originality and only imitates others' work.
  • The "starving artist" who is always struggling financially
  • The "genius" who is unapproachable and aloof
  • The "diva" who is arrogant and difficult to work with

Remember, it's important to create well-rounded and complex characters, even if they have artistic traits. Avoiding these stereotypes can help you create more nuanced and realistic portrayals of artistic characters.

Negatives of being artistic

Here are some potential negatives of being artistic. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • Artistic individuals may struggle with criticism and rejection, as they may take it personally and feel deeply affected by it.
  • They may experience intense emotional highs and lows, which can be challenging to manage.
  • They may struggle with self-doubt and insecurity, which can hinder their creative process.
  • Artistic individuals may struggle with practical tasks or organization.

Positives of being artistic

Here are some potential positives of being artistic. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • They have a strong sense of aesthetics, which means they can appreciate and create beauty in different forms, such as visual arts, music, or writing.
  • Artistic people tend to be more open-minded and curious, always seeking new experiences and perspectives to fuel their creativity.
  • Artistic individuals are often more sensitive and empathetic, which allows them to connect with others on a deeper level and understand different points of view.
  • They have a strong work ethic, as creating art requires dedication, discipline, and perseverance.
  • Artistic individuals are often able to see the world from a different angle, which allows them to offer unique and insightful solutions to problems.
  • They have a strong sense of individuality and are not afraid to stand out from the crowd.
  • Artistic people are creative and imaginative, able to come up with unique and original ideas.
  • They have a passion for self-expression, which gives them the courage to share their thoughts and emotions with the world.

Verbal expressions of artistic characters

Here are some potential expressions used by artistic characters.

  • Making connections between seemingly unrelated things
  • Incorporating symbolism to convey deeper meanings
  • Describing emotions in a unique and creative way
  • Expressing oneself through various mediums (writing, painting, music, etc.)
  • Having a vivid imagination
  • Using colorful and descriptive language
  • Creating dialogue that is realistic and engaging
  • Using metaphors and similes to illustrate ideas
  • Experimenting with different styles and techniques

Relationships of artistic characters

Here are some ways that being artistic could affect your character's relationships.

  • Artistic people may be drawn to others who share their passion for creative expression, and may find it easier to form deep connections with people who understand and appreciate their art.
  • At the same time, artistic people may struggle to relate to those who don't share their interests or who don't see the world in a similarly creative way. This can lead to feelings of isolation or loneliness.
  • Artistic people may be highly sensitive and emotional, which can sometimes make it challenging to navigate social situations. They may be more prone to feeling hurt or offended, and may need more time to process their emotions before responding to others.
  • Artistic people may also be more likely to form intense, passionate relationships that are characterized by ups and downs. They may be attracted to people who challenge them intellectually or emotionally, even if those relationships are occasionally tumultuous.

Examples from books of characters who are artistic

  • Jo March from "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott
  • Jay Gatsby from "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Dorian Gray from "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde
  • Daisy Buchanan from "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Elizabeth Bennet from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Augustus Waters from "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green
  • Clarissa Dalloway from "Mrs. Dalloway" by Virginia Woolf
  • Sherlock Holmes from "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Holden Caulfield from "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger

Writing exercises for writing artistic characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write artistic characters.

  • Write a dialogue where your character discusses their art with someone who doesn't understand or appreciate it. This can highlight their passion and determination to pursue their creative goals despite external obstacles.
  • Create a scene where your character receives criticism or rejection for their art. This can reveal their vulnerability and their ability to handle constructive feedback or disappointment.
  • Show how your character's artistic expression changes over time. For example, a musician may experiment with different genres or instruments, while a sculptor may shift from figurative to abstract art.
  • Write a scene where your character faces a creative block or struggles with finding inspiration. This can reveal their inner conflicts and their resilience in overcoming obstacles.
  • Have your character engage in a creative activity, such as painting, writing, or playing music. Show their passion for the art form and their dedication to improving their skills.
  • Write a scene where your character collaborates with another artist. This can reveal their ability to work with others and their willingness to learn from different perspectives.
  • Show how your character's art influences their worldview and their relationships. For example, a painter may see the world in colors and shapes, while a writer may analyze every conversation as potential dialogue for their stories.
  • Create a backstory for your character that explains how they discovered their artistic talent and what motivates them to continue pursuing it. This can add depth and complexity to their character arc.
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