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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-06 00:00

Character Trait: Functional

Character Trait Functional

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait Functional refers to a person who is efficient, practical, and organized in their approach to life. Functionals are often analytical thinkers who prioritize logic and reason over emotions. They are adept problem solvers who are able to quickly identify and address issues in a logical manner. Functionals are reliable and dependable, often taking on important roles in their personal and professional lives. They are not typically motivated by external recognition or validation, but rather by a sense of personal satisfaction in their accomplishments.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being functional
  2. Behaviors associated with being functional
  3. Attitudes associated with being functional
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being functional
  5. Emotions associated with being functional
  6. Facial expressions associated with being functional
  7. Body language associated with being functional
  8. Behaviors associated with being functional
  9. Growth and evolution of functional characters
  10. Stereotypes of functional characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being functional
  12. Positives of being functional
  13. Verbal expressions of functional characters
  14. Relationships of functional characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are functional
  16. Writing exercises for writing functional characters

Possible causes of being functional

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • Personal values: Individuals who prioritize productivity, achievement, and success may adopt a functional personality as a means to achieve their goals.
  • Natural aptitude: Some people are just naturally inclined towards being functional, organized, and efficient.
  • Learned behavior: Growing up in an environment where functionality was valued and rewarded can lead to the development of a functional personality.
  • Professional demands: Certain careers, such as project management or event planning, require a high level of functionality and may attract individuals with this personality trait.

Behaviors associated with being functional

You may be able to show your character's trait of functional by using these.

  • Seeking solutions to problems and finding ways to improve processes
  • Adapting to changes and challenges in a positive manner
  • Being able to work independently or as part of a team
  • Setting realistic goals and working towards achieving them
  • Being reliable and consistent in behavior and decision making
  • Focusing on the present moment and avoiding distractions
  • Following through on commitments and responsibilities
  • Being organized and efficient in completing tasks
  • Prioritizing tasks based on their importance

Attitudes associated with being functional

You may be able to show functional through their attitudes.

  • Proactive and responsible
  • Able to prioritize and manage time effectively
  • Resourceful and adaptable
  • Goal-driven
  • Organized and efficient
  • Detail-oriented
  • Clear and concise in communication
  • Focused on results
  • Practical and pragmatic

Thoughts and struggles associated with being functional

Here are some ideas for things your functional character may think or struggle with.

  • Functional characters tend to be highly competent, efficient, and practical.
  • They may have a rigid sense of rules and procedures, finding it difficult to think outside the box or deviate from established norms.
  • They may struggle with personal relationships or emotions, finding it difficult to connect with others on an emotional level.
  • They may also struggle with delegation, feeling that they are the only ones who can do the job properly.
  • They may struggle with perfectionism or a fear of failure, feeling pressure to always perform at their best.
  • They may have a tendency to prioritize work or tasks over personal needs or relationships.
  • They may also struggle with creativity or imagination, feeling more comfortable with concrete tasks or data-driven decisions.
  • They often have a strong sense of duty and responsibility, and they take their roles seriously.

Emotions associated with being functional

Here are some ideas for emotions your functional character may experience.

  • Practicality
  • Responsibility
  • Rationality
  • Composure
  • Focus
  • Efficiency
  • Reliability
  • Organization
  • Discipline

Facial expressions associated with being functional

Here are some facial expressions your functional character may exhibit.

  • Dilated pupils or intense eye contact when engaged in a task
  • Minimal or controlled facial movements
  • Neutral or serious expression
  • Firm jawline or tense facial muscles when concentrating
  • Focused gaze
  • Calm and composed facial features

Body language associated with being functional

Here is some body language your functional character may exhibit.

  • Maintaining eye contact during conversations
  • Keeping a calm and composed demeanor in stressful situations
  • Maintaining a relaxed and comfortable posture
  • Nodding or shaking the head appropriately in response to what is being said
  • Showing confidence in one's abilities and decisions
  • Exhibiting good listening skills by facing the speaker and not interrupting them
  • Standing or sitting up straight
  • Using hand gestures to emphasize points or express oneself
  • Reacting appropriately to social cues and norms

Behaviors associated with being functional

Here are some behaviors your functional character may exhibit.

  • Following through on commitments and responsibilities
  • Being organized and efficient in completing tasks
  • Being reliable and consistent in behavior and decision making
  • Prioritizing tasks based on their importance
  • Focusing on the present moment and avoiding distractions
  • Adapting to changes and challenges in a positive manner
  • Setting realistic goals and working towards achieving them
  • Being able to work independently or as part of a team
  • Seeking solutions to problems and finding ways to improve processes

Growth and evolution of functional characters

Here are some ways that your functional character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Functional characters can change their beliefs or values, adapting to the challenges they face throughout the story.
  • Functional characters can evolve by taking on new challenges and stepping outside their comfort zones.
  • They can also experience personal growth and self-discovery, learning more about themselves and their place in the world.
  • Functional characters can face adversity and develop resilience, learning to overcome obstacles and setbacks.
  • They can also deepen their relationships with other characters, forming new alliances or deepening existing ones.
  • They can also grow by developing new skills or abilities that contribute to the overall plot.
  • Functional characters can evolve by taking on new roles or responsibilities within the story.

Stereotypes of functional characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical functional character like these examples.

  • Avoid making the character too dependent on their trait
  • Avoid making the character's trait too extreme or unrealistic
  • Avoid making the character too predictable or one-dimensional
  • Avoid making the character's trait too cliche or overused in literature
  • Avoid making the character too perfect or flawless
  • Avoid making the trait the only defining characteristic of the character

Negatives of being functional

Here are some potential negatives of being functional. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • Can struggle with adapting to change or unexpected situations
  • May struggle with creativity or spontaneity
  • May prioritize logic over empathy or compassion
  • Can be seen as overly critical or judgmental
  • Can be overly rigid and inflexible
  • Can come across as robotic or emotionless
  • May struggle with understanding or managing emotions

Positives of being functional

Here are some potential positives of being functional. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • Detail-oriented and focused on accuracy
  • Organized and structured approach to tasks
  • Reliable and dependable nature
  • Ability to manage time effectively
  • Good at following rules and procedures
  • Consistent and predictable behavior
  • Efficient problem-solving skills
  • Strong sense of responsibility and accountability
  • Adaptable to changes in routine or plans

Verbal expressions of functional characters

Here are some potential expressions used by functional characters.

  • "What's the plan?"
  • "Let's stick to the schedule"
  • "Let's prioritize our tasks"
  • "We need to be efficient"
  • "We need to focus on the task at hand"
  • "Let's make sure everything runs smoothly"
  • "We can't afford to waste time"
  • "We need to be organized"
  • "Let's get down to business"

Relationships of functional characters

Here are some ways that being functional could affect your character's relationships.

  • They are often empathetic and seek to understand the perspectives of others, leading to strong connections with those around them.
  • Functional people tend to have healthy relationships that are built on mutual respect, trust, and open communication.
  • Functional people are comfortable setting boundaries and holding others accountable for their actions, which can lead to positive relationships based on clear expectations.
  • They tend to be good listeners and supportive partners, friends, and family members, creating a sense of safety and security in their relationships.

Examples from books of characters who are functional

  • Don Quixote from "Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes
  • Elizabeth Bennet from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Katniss Everdeen from "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins
  • Sherlock Holmes from "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Atticus Finch from "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee
  • The Narrator from "Fight Club" by Chuck Palahniuk
  • Gandalf from "The Lord of the Rings" by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Holden Caulfield from "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger
  • Dumbledore from the "Harry Potter" series by J.K. Rowling
  • Jay Gatsby from "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald

These characters are examples of functional characters that serve a clear purpose in the story and help drive the plot forward.

Writing exercises for writing functional characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write functional characters.

  • Create a backstory for the character that highlights how their Functional trait developed or was influenced by their past experiences.
  • Show the character problem-solving and using their Functional trait to overcome obstacles or challenges.
  • Write scenes from the character's point of view that highlight their thought process and how their Functional trait influences their decisions.
  • Identify the character's primary goal or motivation and make it the driving force behind their actions and decisions.
  • Create conflicts or situations that test the character's Functional trait and force them to adapt or change.
  • Have the character interact with other characters who have different traits or personalities, highlighting how their Functional trait affects those relationships.
  • Use dialogue to show how the character's Functional trait affects their communication and interactions with others.
  • Give the character specific skills or knowledge related to their Functional trait and have them use those abilities in the story.
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