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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-02 00:00

Character Trait: Applicable

Character Trait Applicable

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait "applicable" refers to an individual's ability to apply knowledge, skills, or principles in a practical way. It involves being able to connect the dots between different situations and apply what you have learned to solve problems or make decisions. Someone who possesses this trait is resourceful, adaptable, and able to think critically and creatively. They are often able to see opportunities where others may not and can apply their knowledge to achieve their goals effectively.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being applicable
  2. Behaviors associated with being applicable
  3. Attitudes associated with being applicable
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being applicable
  5. Emotions associated with being applicable
  6. Facial expressions associated with being applicable
  7. Body language associated with being applicable
  8. Behaviors associated with being applicable
  9. Growth and evolution of applicable characters
  10. Stereotypes of applicable characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being applicable
  12. Positives of being applicable
  13. Verbal expressions of applicable characters
  14. Relationships of applicable characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are applicable
  16. Writing exercises for writing applicable characters

Possible causes of being applicable

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • An openness to feedback and constructive criticism.
  • A tendency to think critically and evaluate information before making decisions.
  • A natural inclination towards problem-solving and finding practical solutions.
  • A tendency to prioritize goals and tasks based on their relevance and impact.
  • A desire to be useful and contribute to the greater good.
  • An ability to adapt and apply skills and knowledge to different situations.
  • A sense of responsibility and accountability for one's actions and choices.
  • A willingness to learn and apply new ideas and perspectives.
  • A strong sense of empathy and understanding towards others' experiences and emotions.

For detailed feedback on applicable characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's narrative quality assessment.

Behaviors associated with being applicable

You may be able to show your character's trait of applicable by using these.

  • Being open to learning and trying new things
  • Being able to communicate ideas and information clearly and effectively
  • Being able to prioritize and organize tasks effectively
  • Being willing to take on new challenges and responsibilities
  • Being adaptable to different situations and environments
  • Being able to work collaboratively with others towards a common goal
  • Being able to find practical solutions to problems
  • Being able to think creatively and outside the box
  • Being able to apply knowledge and skills in new contexts

Attitudes associated with being applicable

You may be able to show applicable through their attitudes.

  • Practicality and usefulness
  • Ability to prioritize and manage time effectively
  • Resourcefulness and problem-solving skills
  • Empathy and understanding of others' needs
  • Attention to detail and precision
  • Focus on results and outcomes
  • Flexibility and adaptability
  • Relevance and timeliness
  • Open-mindedness and willingness to learn

Thoughts and struggles associated with being applicable

Here are some ideas for things your applicable character may think or struggle with.

  • They may struggle with balancing their desire for efficiency with their emotions and relationships.
  • They may struggle with perfectionism, feeling like they always need to do things "right" or meet certain standards.
  • They may have a strong sense of responsibility and duty, which can sometimes lead to feelings of being overwhelmed or burdened.
  • They may have difficulty dealing with ambiguity or uncertainty, preferring clear-cut solutions and plans.
  • Applicable characters may have a tendency to overanalyze or overthink situations, which can lead to indecisiveness or anxiety.
  • Applicable characters may prioritize logic and rationality over intuition and creativity, which can limit their ability to think outside the box.
  • Applicable characters are often concerned with practicality and usefulness.

Emotions associated with being applicable

Here are some ideas for emotions your applicable character may experience.

  • Contribution
  • Value
  • Sense of purpose
  • Confidence
  • Self-assurance
  • Relevance
  • Worth
  • Significance
  • Importance

Facial expressions associated with being applicable

Here are some facial expressions your applicable character may exhibit.

  • A focused look
  • A nodding head
  • A look of confidence
  • A thoughtful expression
  • A smile of recognition
  • A look of approval
  • A quizzical expression
  • Raised eyebrows
  • A look of determination

Body language associated with being applicable

Here is some body language your applicable character may exhibit.

  • Remaining relaxed and not tense or defensive
  • Maintaining good eye contact
  • Smiling and showing a warm facial expression
  • Demonstrating a willingness to learn or adapt to new situations
  • Listening actively and showing interest in what the other person is saying
  • Nodding your head in agreement
  • Using open and welcoming hand gestures
  • Using affirmative phrases like "I see" or "That makes sense"
  • Leaning in slightly towards the person you are speaking to

For detailed feedback on applicable characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's narrative quality assessment.

Behaviors associated with being applicable

Here are some behaviors your applicable character may exhibit.

  • Being willing to take on new challenges and responsibilities
  • Being adaptable to different situations and environments
  • Being able to prioritize and organize tasks effectively
  • Being open to learning and trying new things
  • Being able to communicate ideas and information clearly and effectively
  • Being able to work collaboratively with others towards a common goal
  • Being able to find practical solutions to problems
  • Being able to apply knowledge and skills in new contexts
  • Being able to think creatively and outside the box

Growth and evolution of applicable characters

Here are some ways that your applicable character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Facing and resolving conflicts
  • Learning a new skill or gaining knowledge
  • Letting go of past traumas or regrets
  • Experiencing personal growth through self-reflection and introspection
  • Overcoming their fears or weaknesses
  • Making difficult choices that challenge their morals or ethics
  • Changing their beliefs or values
  • Discovering their true identity or purpose
  • Developing deeper relationships with other characters

Stereotypes of applicable characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical applicable character like these examples.

  • Avoid making characters overly cliché, such as the "tortured artist" or the "rebel without a cause"
  • Avoid making characters solely defined by their race, gender, or sexual orientation
  • Avoid making characters too perfect, as flaws and imperfections are what make characters relatable and interesting
  • Avoid one-dimensional stereotypes such as the "dumb jock" or the "damsel in distress"

Negatives of being applicable

Here are some potential negatives of being applicable. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • Can be seen as boring or unremarkable
  • May struggle to take risks or try new things
  • May struggle to assert oneself and take charge
  • May struggle to stand out or make a lasting impression

Positives of being applicable

Here are some potential positives of being applicable. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • Being applicable means that a character is relevant and useful in the story.
  • They can be instrumental in achieving the protagonist's goals or in creating conflict for them.
  • Applicable characters can help move the plot forward or solve problems.
  • They are often resourceful and able to adapt to changing circumstances.
  • They can be effective leaders or mentors to other characters.
  • Applicable characters can be inspiring and motivating to other characters in the story.
  • They may have a strong sense of purpose or a clear vision of what they want to achieve.
  • Applicable characters tend to be proactive and have agency, rather than being passive or reactive.

Verbal expressions of applicable characters

Here are some potential expressions used by applicable characters.

  • Adequate for the need
  • Suitable for the context
  • Pertinent to the topic
  • Appropriate for the audience
  • Relevant to the situation
  • Fitting to the purpose
  • Applicable to the problem
  • Timely for the moment
  • Valid for the occasion

Relationships of applicable characters

Here are some ways that being applicable could affect your character's relationships.

  • However, they may also struggle with setting boundaries and may become overwhelmed with the needs of others.
  • They may be seen as reliable and trustworthy, leading to close friendships and partnerships.
  • Applicable people may also have a tendency to be critical of others who do not meet their standards, leading to strained relationships.
  • Applicable people may have a strong desire to help others and often take on a mentor or teacher role.
  • In romantic relationships, they may prioritize practicality over passion and may struggle with expressing their emotions.

Examples from books of characters who are applicable

  • Jean Valjean from "Les Misérables" by Victor Hugo
  • Holden Caulfield from "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger
  • Bilbo Baggins from "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Jay Gatsby from "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Elizabeth Bennet from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Katniss Everdeen from "The Hunger Games" series by Suzanne Collins
  • Harry Potter from the "Harry Potter" series by J.K. Rowling
  • Sherlock Holmes from the "Sherlock Holmes" series by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Atticus Finch from "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

Writing exercises for writing applicable characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write applicable characters.

  • Write a scene in which the character displays the trait. This could be a positive or negative situation, but make sure the trait is evident in their actions and reactions.
  • Use sensory details to show the trait. What does the character see, hear, smell, taste, and feel that reinforces their belief in the trait?
  • Write a scene in which the character struggles to exhibit the trait. What obstacles do they face? How do they overcome them (or not)?
  • Begin by defining the trait. What does it mean to have this trait? What are the behaviors and actions that embody it?
  • Create a character who is the opposite of the trait. How do they clash with the character who embodies it? What conflicts arise from this clash?
  • Write a scene in which the character learns the value of the trait. What event or experience causes them to see the importance of embodying it?
  • Create a character who embodies the trait. What is their backstory? How did they develop this trait? What motivates them to act in accordance with it?
  • Use dialogue to show the trait. Have the character express their thoughts and beliefs in a way that reflects the trait.
  • Look for examples of the trait in real life. Observe people who exhibit the trait, and take notes on their behaviors and speech patterns.
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