Get 25% OFF new yearly plans in our Spring Sale

Buy now
Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-02 00:00

Character Trait: Agreeable

Character Trait Agreeable

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait agreeable is characterized by a person's tendency to be cooperative, friendly, and easy to get along with. Agreeable individuals are often empathetic and compassionate towards others, and they prioritize maintaining positive relationships with those around them. They tend to avoid conflict and seek to find common ground in difficult situations. Overall, agreeable characters are likable, approachable, and make for great protagonists or supporting characters in a story.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being agreeable
  2. Behaviors associated with being agreeable
  3. Attitudes associated with being agreeable
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being agreeable
  5. Emotions associated with being agreeable
  6. Facial expressions associated with being agreeable
  7. Body language associated with being agreeable
  8. Behaviors associated with being agreeable
  9. Growth and evolution of agreeable characters
  10. Stereotypes of agreeable characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being agreeable
  12. Positives of being agreeable
  13. Verbal expressions of agreeable characters
  14. Relationships of agreeable characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are agreeable
  16. Writing exercises for writing agreeable characters

Possible causes of being agreeable

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • Genetics and biological factors
  • Environmental factors, such as upbringing and cultural norms
  • Desire for harmony and peace in relationships
  • Willingness to compromise and seek common ground
  • Education and socialization
  • Positive outlook and attitude towards others
  • Life experiences and personal beliefs
  • Personality traits, such as empathy and compassion
  • Emotional intelligence and self-awareness

For detailed feedback on agreeable characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fiction manuscript feedback.

Behaviors associated with being agreeable

You may be able to show your character's trait of agreeable by using these.

  • Showing empathy and understanding towards others' perspectives
  • Avoiding arguments or conflicts
  • Willingness to compromise or find a middle ground
  • Being open-minded and receptive to feedback
  • Being flexible and adaptable to change
  • Avoiding being critical or judgmental of others
  • Being polite and respectful in interactions with others
  • Being supportive and helpful to others

Attitudes associated with being agreeable

You may be able to show agreeable through their attitudes.

  • Cooperative behavior
  • Willingness to compromise
  • Being kind and considerate
  • Showing empathy towards others
  • Avoiding confrontation
  • Being easy-going
  • Prioritizing harmony over winning
  • Being open-minded
  • Being polite and respectful

Thoughts and struggles associated with being agreeable

Here are some ideas for things your agreeable character may think or struggle with.

  • Tendency to avoid conflict and prioritize harmony in relationships
  • Constantly seeking approval and validation from others
  • Difficulty asserting their own opinions or standing up for themselves
  • May struggle with decision making, as they want to make everyone happy and may have difficulty prioritizing their own needs and wants
  • May have a tendency to apologize excessively or take blame for things that are not their fault
  • Fear of being disliked or rejected by others
  • Can be taken advantage of by others due to their desire to please
  • May struggle with setting boundaries and saying "no"

Emotions associated with being agreeable

Here are some ideas for emotions your agreeable character may experience.

  • Forgiveness
  • Compassion
  • Trust
  • Humility
  • Openness
  • Kindness
  • Empathy
  • Cooperation
  • Tolerance

Facial expressions associated with being agreeable

Here are some facial expressions your agreeable character may exhibit.

  • A slight bow or lean forward
  • Raised eyebrows
  • A relaxed facial expression
  • Softening of the eyes
  • A gentle or soft tone of voice
  • A smile or gentle grin
  • A nod or tilt of the head

Body language associated with being agreeable

Here is some body language your agreeable character may exhibit.

  • Using open and relaxed gestures
  • Speaking softly and calmly
  • Avoiding confrontational or aggressive postures
  • Nodding and smiling often
  • Maintaining eye contact while conversing
  • Leaning towards the person they're talking to

For detailed feedback on agreeable characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fiction manuscript feedback.

Behaviors associated with being agreeable

Here are some behaviors your agreeable character may exhibit.

  • Avoiding arguments or conflicts
  • Being flexible and adaptable to change
  • Avoiding being critical or judgmental of others
  • Showing empathy and understanding towards others' perspectives
  • Being supportive and helpful to others
  • Being open-minded and receptive to feedback
  • Being polite and respectful in interactions with others
  • Willingness to compromise or find a middle ground

Growth and evolution of agreeable characters

Here are some ways that your agreeable character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Develop a greater sense of self-awareness and self-confidence
  • Learn to balance their own needs with the needs of others
  • Develop stronger boundaries and learn to say no when necessary
  • Learn to stand up for themselves and their beliefs
  • Become more assertive in their relationships and communication
  • Develop more resilience and coping skills for dealing with conflict or adversity
  • Learn to forgive and let go of grudges or resentment
  • Develop stronger empathy and understanding for others who may have different perspectives or experiences

Stereotypes of agreeable characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical agreeable character like these examples.

  • Always avoiding conflict or confrontation, even when it's necessary
  • Overly submissive or passive behavior
  • Being too dependent on others for validation or approval
  • Being too trusting or naive, unable to recognize when someone is taking advantage of them
  • Being too agreeable to the point of being unrealistic or unrelatable
  • Being too self-sacrificing, always putting others first without regard for their own needs
  • Being too eager to please others at the expense of their own well-being
  • Being a pushover or unable to stand up for oneself
  • Lacking a sense of individuality or having a strong sense of self

Negatives of being agreeable

Here are some potential negatives of being agreeable. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • Difficulty setting boundaries and saying "no" when necessary
  • Tendency to avoid conflict and potentially sacrificing one's own needs in order to please others
  • Difficulty asserting oneself and standing up for personal beliefs
  • Potential for being taken advantage of or manipulated by others
  • Difficulty making decisions, especially when others' opinions are involved

Positives of being agreeable

Here are some potential positives of being agreeable. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • They are often easy to get along with and can help diffuse tension or conflict in a group.
  • They are reliable and dependable, and can be counted on to follow through on commitments.
  • They are good listeners and are often able to understand others' perspectives.
  • Agreeable people tend to be kind, compassionate, and empathetic towards others.
  • Agreeable individuals are team players and work well in collaborative settings.
  • They are often humble and unassuming, and are not driven by a need for attention or recognition.

Verbal expressions of agreeable characters

Here are some potential expressions used by agreeable characters.

  • "I'm open to feedback."
  • "Thank you for bringing that up."
  • "I'm happy to help."
  • "I see your point."
  • "Let's work together to find a solution."
  • "I don't mind compromising."
  • "I appreciate your perspective."
  • "That's a great idea!"
  • "I understand where you're coming from."

Relationships of agreeable characters

Here are some ways that being agreeable could affect your character's relationships.

  • They may also avoid conflict or difficult conversations, which can lead to passive-aggressive behavior or bottling up emotions.
  • However, they may struggle to assert themselves or set boundaries, which can lead to being taken advantage of or feeling resentful.
  • In group settings, Agreeable people may be seen as peacemakers or mediators, but may also struggle to make decisions or take charge.
  • They are good listeners and empathetic, which can make them great friends and partners.
  • Agreeable people tend to be cooperative and accommodating, often putting the needs of others before their own.
  • They may have a tendency to please others at the expense of their own needs or desires.

Examples from books of characters who are agreeable

  • Charlotte Lucas from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Samwise Gamgee from "The Lord of the Rings" by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Bilbo Baggins from "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Hermione Granger from the "Harry Potter" series by J.K. Rowling
  • Atticus Finch from "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee
  • Jane Bennet from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Mr. Bingley from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Winnie the Pooh from the "Winnie the Pooh" series by A.A. Milne
  • Anne Shirley from "Anne of Green Gables" by L.M. Montgomery

Writing exercises for writing agreeable characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write agreeable characters.

  • Show your character being patient and understanding towards someone who is struggling to learn or improve.
  • Have your character volunteer for a cause they believe in, without expecting any reward or recognition for their actions.
  • Show your character being kind and supportive towards a friend or family member who is going through a difficult time.
  • Write a dialogue between your character and someone who is angry or upset, where they remain calm and try to deescalate the situation.
  • Show your character being respectful towards people from different backgrounds or with different beliefs.
  • Write a scene in which your character goes out of their way to help someone in need, even if it inconveniences them.
  • Write a dialogue between your character and someone they disagree with, where they try to find common ground and reach a compromise.
  • Show your character being empathetic and understanding towards someone who has hurt them.
  • Write a scene in which your character puts others' needs before their own, even if it means sacrificing something they wanted.
Be confident about grammar

Check every email, essay, or story for grammar mistakes. Fix them before you press send.