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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-06 00:00

Character Trait: Extroverted

Character Trait Extroverted

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait of being extroverted refers to individuals who are outgoing, sociable, and enjoy being around other people. They tend to be energized by social interactions and feel comfortable in group settings. Extroverted individuals often express themselves openly and enjoy being the center of attention. They are often seen as talkative, confident, and assertive.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being extroverted
  2. Behaviors associated with being extroverted
  3. Attitudes associated with being extroverted
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being extroverted
  5. Emotions associated with being extroverted
  6. Facial expressions associated with being extroverted
  7. Body language associated with being extroverted
  8. Behaviors associated with being extroverted
  9. Growth and evolution of extroverted characters
  10. Stereotypes of extroverted characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being extroverted
  12. Positives of being extroverted
  13. Verbal expressions of extroverted characters
  14. Relationships of extroverted characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are extroverted
  16. Writing exercises for writing extroverted characters

Possible causes of being extroverted

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • Culture: Some cultures place a higher value on socializing and outgoing behavior, which may encourage extroverted traits.
  • Genetic predisposition: Some studies suggest that extroversion may be partly inherited and can run in families.
  • Brain chemistry: Research shows that extroverts have more activity in the brain's reward system, which may make them more motivated to seek out social interaction.
  • Early experiences: Positive social experiences in childhood, such as having supportive parents and peers, may lead to a more outgoing personality.

Behaviors associated with being extroverted

You may be able to show your character's trait of extroverted by using these.

  • Seeking social interaction and engagement with others.
  • Feeling energized and motivated by being around people.
  • Making friends easily and enjoy networking.
  • Preferring to work collaboratively in a team.
  • Being comfortable in the spotlight and enjoy attention.
  • Being assertive and confident in expressing opinions.
  • Being outgoing and talkative in group settings.

Attitudes associated with being extroverted

You may be able to show extroverted through their attitudes.

  • Often speaks before thinking
  • May struggle with introspection and self-reflection
  • May have a larger social circle and enjoy maintaining many friendships
  • May become easily bored or restless when alone
  • Enjoys engaging in group activities and working in collaborative environments
  • Outgoing and sociable
  • Enjoys being the center of attention
  • Thrives in social situations and enjoys meeting new people
  • Enjoys taking risks and trying new things

Thoughts and struggles associated with being extroverted

Here are some ideas for things your extroverted character may think or struggle with.

  • They may struggle with deep introspection or self-reflection, as they may prefer to focus on external experiences and people.
  • An extroverted character may have a strong desire to be around people and crave social interaction.
  • They may feel drained or exhausted after social events or interactions, even if they enjoyed them.
  • They may have a tendency to overshare or speak before thinking, which can lead to misunderstandings or hurt feelings.
  • They may struggle with listening to others and may interrupt or talk over people.
  • They may have a fear of missing out on social opportunities and may feel pressure to constantly be involved in social activities.
  • They may struggle with being alone for extended periods of time and may feel restless or anxious when not surrounded by others.

Emotions associated with being extroverted

Here are some ideas for emotions your extroverted character may experience.

  • Sociable
  • Assertive
  • Charismatic
  • Adventurous
  • Talkative
  • Confident
  • Outgoing
  • Enthusiastic
  • Energetic

Facial expressions associated with being extroverted

Here are some facial expressions your extroverted character may exhibit.

  • Open-mouthed laughter
  • Raised eyebrows
  • Animated facial expressions
  • Expressive eyes
  • Big, wide smile
  • Quick to smile or laugh
  • Relaxed facial muscles
  • Open, welcoming expression
  • Direct eye contact

Body language associated with being extroverted

Here is some body language your extroverted character may exhibit.

  • Moving around frequently while talking or presenting
  • Having a wide range of facial expressions, including smiles and laughter
  • Touching or patting others on the back or arm while talking
  • Speaking in a loud or animated voice
  • Standing or sitting with an open, relaxed posture
  • Leaning forward to show interest and engagement
  • Maintaining eye contact
  • Using expressive hand gestures while speaking

Behaviors associated with being extroverted

Here are some behaviors your extroverted character may exhibit.

  • Seeking social interaction and engagement with others.
  • Making friends easily and enjoy networking.
  • Feeling energized and motivated by being around people.
  • Being outgoing and talkative in group settings.
  • Preferring to work collaboratively in a team.
  • Being comfortable in the spotlight and enjoy attention.
  • Being assertive and confident in expressing opinions.

Growth and evolution of extroverted characters

Here are some ways that your extroverted character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Learning to listen more and talk less, especially during important moments
  • Becoming more empathetic towards introverted characters or those with different personalities
  • Learning to balance their need for social interaction with their responsibilities and obligations
  • Learning to adapt and adjust to different social situations and environments
  • Becoming more comfortable with vulnerability and emotional expression
  • Developing deeper relationships with others beyond surface-level connections
  • Recognizing the impact their actions have on others and taking responsibility for them
  • Learning to value alone time and introspection as necessary for personal growth

Stereotypes of extroverted characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical extroverted character like these examples.

  • The shallow and superficial person who judges others based on appearances and social status
  • The hyperactive and restless person who can't sit still or focus on anything
  • The insensitive person who always speaks their mind without considering the feelings of others
  • The manipulative and insincere person who uses charm to get what they want without caring about others
  • The overbearing and controlling person who tries to impose their will on others
  • The impulsive and reckless person who doesn't think before acting
  • The attention-seeking person who constantly seeks validation and approval from others
  • The "life of the party" who always craves attention and dominates every conversation
  • The overly talkative person who never stops talking and interrupts others constantly

Negatives of being extroverted

Here are some potential negatives of being extroverted. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • May struggle to listen and focus on others, as they tend to dominate conversations
  • May struggle to process their own emotions and thoughts without external input
  • May have a tendency to seek attention and validation from others
  • May struggle with alone time and need constant social interaction

Positives of being extroverted

Here are some potential positives of being extroverted. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • Extroverted individuals are generally seen as confident and assertive, which can be beneficial in leadership roles and professional settings.
  • Extroverts thrive in group settings and often enjoy being the center of attention, making them great at public speaking and performing.
  • They tend to be optimistic and enthusiastic, bringing positivity and energy to their interactions and relationships.
  • They tend to be energized by social interactions and often seek out new experiences and adventures.
  • They often have a natural ability to communicate effectively, express their thoughts and ideas, and engage others in conversation.
  • Extroverted individuals tend to be outgoing and sociable, making it easier for them to connect with new people and build relationships.

Verbal expressions of extroverted characters

Here are some potential expressions used by extroverted characters.

  • Loves socializing and meeting new people
  • Enjoys being the center of attention
  • Expressive and talkative
  • Tends to think out loud
  • Enjoys participating in group activities
  • Draws energy from being around others
  • Has a wide circle of friends and acquaintances
  • Feels comfortable in large groups
  • Enjoys public speaking and presenting
  • Initiates conversations easily
  • Feels bored or restless when alone for too long

Relationships of extroverted characters

Here are some ways that being extroverted could affect your character's relationships.

  • Tend to be outgoing and talkative
  • May have a tendency to overcommit themselves socially, leading to burnout
  • Often have many friends and acquaintances
  • May be more comfortable in group settings than one-on-one situations
  • Can sometimes dominate conversations or interrupt others
  • May struggle with listening and giving others a chance to speak
  • Can be energized by social interactions and may feel drained when alone for too long.
  • Can be seen as charismatic and engaging
  • May have a larger social circle but may struggle with deepening individual relationships
  • Enjoy being around people and often seek out social situations

Remember, these are just generalizations and not everyone who is extroverted will exhibit all of these traits. It's important to remember that everyone is unique and complex.

Examples from books of characters who are extroverted

  • Katniss Everdeen from "The Hunger Games" series by Suzanne Collins
  • Holden Caulfield from "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger
  • Elizabeth Bennet from "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen
  • Harry Potter from the "Harry Potter" series by J.K. Rowling
  • Jo March from "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott
  • Sherlock Holmes from the "Sherlock Holmes" series by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Holly Golightly from "Breakfast at Tiffany's" by Truman Capote
  • Jay Gatsby from "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Tyrion Lannister from "A Song of Ice and Fire" series by George R.R. Martin

Writing exercises for writing extroverted characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write extroverted characters.

  • Develop a backstory for the extroverted character that explains why they are outgoing and social, such as growing up in a large family or being involved in theater or sports.
  • Write a scene where the extroverted character attends a party or social event and is the life of the party, but also shows vulnerability and depth beyond their outgoing persona.
  • Create a scene where the extroverted character takes charge and leads a group of people towards a common goal.
  • Write a scene where the extroverted character is faced with a conflict or challenge that requires them to use their communication skills and social intelligence to resolve the situation.
  • Write a dialogue where the extroverted character engages with an introverted character and helps them come out of their shell.
  • Create a character arc for the extroverted character where they learn the value of listening and introspection, and how it can enhance their relationships and personal growth.
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