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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-06 00:00

Character Trait: Effective

Character Trait Effective

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait "effective" refers to the ability of a person to produce the desired result or achieve their goals efficiently and with a high level of competency. An effective character is one who is capable of making informed decisions, taking action, and achieving their objectives in a timely and efficient manner, while also being able to adapt and pivot when necessary. An effective character is often seen as a problem solver, a leader, and a trusted figure in their community or workplace.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being effective
  2. Behaviors associated with being effective
  3. Attitudes associated with being effective
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being effective
  5. Emotions associated with being effective
  6. Facial expressions associated with being effective
  7. Body language associated with being effective
  8. Behaviors associated with being effective
  9. Growth and evolution of effective characters
  10. Stereotypes of effective characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being effective
  12. Positives of being effective
  13. Verbal expressions of effective characters
  14. Relationships of effective characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are effective
  16. Writing exercises for writing effective characters

Possible causes of being effective

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • Strong problem-solving and decision-making abilities
  • Clear communication skills and ability to express oneself effectively
  • Positive self-image and confidence in oneself
  • Strong work ethic and ability to prioritize tasks effectively
  • Sense of responsibility and accountability for their actions
  • Perseverance and determination to achieve their goals
  • Adaptability and flexibility in the face of change or challenges
  • Open-mindedness and willingness to listen to others' perspectives
  • Empathy and emotional intelligence, allowing them to connect with others on a deeper level

Behaviors associated with being effective

You may be able to show your character's trait of effective by using these.

  • Communicating effectively with others
  • Setting clear goals and objectives
  • Being adaptable and flexible in changing situations
  • Continuously learning and improving skills
  • Being organized and staying focused
  • Prioritizing tasks and managing time efficiently
  • Collaborating with others and building relationships
  • Taking responsibility for one's actions and decisions
  • Seeking feedback and constructive criticism

Attitudes associated with being effective

You may be able to show effective through their attitudes.

  • Having strong problem-solving skills
  • Being able to prioritize and manage time effectively
  • Being goal-oriented and results-driven
  • Being organized and efficient
  • Having good communication skills
  • Being able to make decisions confidently
  • Being able to work well under pressure
  • Being proactive and taking initiative
  • Being adaptable and flexible

Thoughts and struggles associated with being effective

Here are some ideas for things your effective character may think or struggle with.

  • Perfectionism: they may be driven to achieve excellence in everything they do, which can lead to feelings of anxiety and self-doubt if they fall short of their own high standards.
  • Sense of responsibility: they may feel a strong sense of duty to others or to a particular cause, which can make it difficult for them to say no or take time for themselves.
  • Fear of failure: they may be driven to succeed, but may also be afraid of making mistakes or taking risks that could lead to failure.
  • Perseverance: they may have a strong sense of determination and the ability to keep pushing through difficult circumstances, even when it feels like giving up would be easier.
  • Overthinking: they may have a tendency to analyze situations from multiple angles, which can make it difficult for them to make decisions or take action.
  • Imposter syndrome: they may struggle with feeling like they are not truly qualified or deserving of their successes, even if they have worked hard to achieve them.
  • Selflessness: they may prioritize the needs of others above their own, which can lead to feelings of burnout or resentment if they don't set boundaries.

Emotions associated with being effective

Here are some ideas for emotions your effective character may experience.

  • Resourcefulness
  • Resilience
  • Focus
  • Leadership
  • Determination
  • Accountability
  • Confidence
  • Self-discipline
  • Perseverance

Facial expressions associated with being effective

Here are some facial expressions your effective character may exhibit.

  • Clear and concise speech
  • Confident smile
  • Stern or determined look
  • Relaxed yet alert facial muscles
  • Focused gaze
  • Firm yet friendly expression
  • Raised eyebrows
  • A look of assurance and control

Body language associated with being effective

Here is some body language your effective character may exhibit.

  • Using facial expressions to convey emotions and engage with others
  • Speaking clearly and with conviction, using a strong and steady tone
  • Being mindful of personal space, respecting the boundaries of others
  • Displaying active listening skills, nodding and responding appropriately to others
  • Using confident and assertive gestures, such as standing up straight and making purposeful movements
  • Having an open and relaxed posture, avoiding hunching or crossing arms
  • Maintaining eye contact with others

Behaviors associated with being effective

Here are some behaviors your effective character may exhibit.

  • Seeking feedback and constructive criticism
  • Prioritizing tasks and managing time efficiently
  • Being adaptable and flexible in changing situations
  • Collaborating with others and building relationships
  • Setting clear goals and objectives
  • Continuously learning and improving skills
  • Being organized and staying focused
  • Communicating effectively with others
  • Taking responsibility for one's actions and decisions

Growth and evolution of effective characters

Here are some ways that your effective character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Changing their perspective or worldview
  • Facing and overcoming external challenges or obstacles
  • Confronting and resolving internal conflicts
  • Experiencing personal growth or self-discovery
  • Forming stronger relationships with other characters
  • Healing from past traumas or emotional wounds
  • Developing new skills or abilities
  • Overcoming a flaw or weakness
  • Learning a valuable lesson

Stereotypes of effective characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical effective character like these examples.

  • Avoid making assumptions about a character's personality based on their race, gender, or sexuality
  • Avoid relying solely on physical appearance to define a character's personality or traits
  • Avoid making a character's traits too predictable or cliché, such as the "nerdy scientist" or the "rebellious teenager"
  • Avoid making a character's traits too extreme or unrealistic, such as a character who is always happy or always angry
  • Avoid one-dimensional stereotypes such as the "damsel in distress" or the "macho hero"

Negatives of being effective

Here are some potential negatives of being effective. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • Burnout: constantly being effective can lead to burnout and exhaustion
  • Perfectionism: being effective can lead to a tendency for perfectionism and an inability to accept mistakes or imperfections
  • Control freak: being effective can lead to a desire for control, which can lead to micromanagement and difficulty delegating tasks
  • Over-commitment: being effective can lead to over-commitment and taking on too many tasks, which can lead to stress and inability to complete tasks effectively

Positives of being effective

Here are some potential positives of being effective. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • Being effective can increase your self-confidence and self-esteem.
  • They are able to prioritize tasks and make decisions that lead to successful outcomes.
  • It allows you to manage your time better and use it more productively.
  • They are able to communicate clearly and efficiently to get their message across.
  • Being effective helps you achieve your goals efficiently.
  • Effective individuals are often seen as reliable and dependable.

Verbal expressions of effective characters

Here are some potential expressions used by effective characters.

  • "Focused"
  • "Efficient"
  • "Achieves goals"
  • "Assertive"
  • "Delivers on promises"
  • "Communicates clearly"
  • "Influential"
  • "Organized"
  • "Gets the job done"
  • "Decisive"
  • "Proactive"
  • "Problem-solver"
  • "Persuasive"
  • "Follows through"
  • "Confident"
  • "Takes initiative"
  • "Produces results"

Relationships of effective characters

Here are some ways that being effective could affect your character's relationships.

  • Balancing assertiveness and diplomacy in conflict resolution
  • Showing appreciation and recognition for others' contributions and achievements
  • Being open-minded and willing to consider different perspectives
  • Building trust and rapport through active listening and empathy
  • Recognizing and valuing diversity in backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives
  • Collaborating and seeking input from others to achieve common goals
  • Respecting boundaries and communicating clearly with others
  • Holding oneself and others accountable for their actions and decisions
  • Maintaining a positive attitude and focusing on solutions rather than problems

Examples from books of characters who are effective

  • Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series by Stieg Larsson
  • Sherlock Holmes from the Sherlock Holmes series by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Harry Potter from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
  • Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins
  • Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Frodo Baggins from The Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Jay Gatsby from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Writing exercises for writing effective characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write effective characters.

  • Consider your character's flaws. No one is perfect, and even the most effective people have weaknesses. How do your character's flaws impact their effectiveness, and how do they work to overcome them?
  • Use dialogue to show your character's effectiveness. Have them use persuasive language, make quick decisions, or be resourceful in their problem-solving.
  • Write a scene where your character struggles to be effective. What obstacles do they face? How do they overcome them? What do they learn about themselves in the process?
  • Start by defining what "effective" means for your character. Are they efficient, resourceful, persuasive, or something else? This will help you create a clear vision of what you want to convey.
  • Show how your character's effectiveness affects those around them. Do they inspire others to be more effective? Do they intimidate or frustrate those who are less effective?
  • Think about characters in real life or in other works of fiction who embody the trait of effectiveness. What makes them effective? How do they behave? What are their strengths and weaknesses?
  • Create a scenario where your character needs to demonstrate their effectiveness. It could be a high-pressure situation at work, a persuasive argument in a social setting, or a resourceful solution to a problem.
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