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Inspiration Decks Character Traits 2023-12-02 00:00

Character Trait: Convincing

Character Trait Convincing

To engage your reader, it's important to always show not tell the traits of your characters. The character trait Convincing refers to a person's ability to persuade or influence others towards a certain belief, idea, or course of action. A convincing character is able to present their arguments in a clear, logical, and compelling way that convinces others to agree with them. They have a strong presence and charisma that draws people to them, and they are often seen as leaders or influencers. However, it's important to note that being convincing doesn't necessarily mean being truthful or ethical, so it's important for writers to consider the motivations and actions of their characters when portraying this trait.

Contents:
  1. Possible causes of being convincing
  2. Behaviors associated with being convincing
  3. Attitudes associated with being convincing
  4. Thoughts and struggles associated with being convincing
  5. Emotions associated with being convincing
  6. Facial expressions associated with being convincing
  7. Body language associated with being convincing
  8. Behaviors associated with being convincing
  9. Growth and evolution of convincing characters
  10. Stereotypes of convincing characters to avoid
  11. Negatives of being convincing
  12. Positives of being convincing
  13. Verbal expressions of convincing characters
  14. Relationships of convincing characters
  15. Examples from books of characters who are convincing
  16. Writing exercises for writing convincing characters

Possible causes of being convincing

You might want to weave these into your character's back story to build a more believable character.

  • A deep understanding of human behavior and psychology
  • Confidence and self-assurance
  • Knowledge and expertise in a particular area or field
  • Ability to read and respond to other people's emotions and needs
  • Charisma and likability
  • Experience and credibility in relevant situations
  • Strong communication skills, such as being articulate and persuasive
  • A clear sense of purpose or mission
  • Strong values and ethics that others find admirable

For detailed feedback on convincing characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fictional story assessment.

Behaviors associated with being convincing

You may be able to show your character's trait of convincing by using these.

  • Speaking clearly and confidently
  • Establishing credibility and authority on the subject
  • Using facts and evidence to support arguments
  • Maintaining eye contact and good body language
  • Anticipating objections and addressing them preemptively
  • Appealing to emotions and values
  • Being passionate and enthusiastic about the topic
  • Listening actively and responding thoughtfully to others' concerns
  • Using persuasive language and rhetorical devices

Attitudes associated with being convincing

You may be able to show convincing through their attitudes.

  • Empathy: they can understand and empathize with others' perspectives, which helps them tailor their arguments or actions to be more convincing.
  • Clarity: they communicate their ideas clearly and effectively, using language that is easy to understand and memorable.
  • Confidence: convincing characters are often confident in their beliefs and actions, even if they face opposition or doubt from others.
  • Persuasiveness: they are skilled at persuading others to see their point of view or to take a particular course of action.
  • Persistence: they don't give up easily and are willing to work hard to convince others of their ideas or beliefs.

Thoughts and struggles associated with being convincing

Here are some ideas for things your convincing character may think or struggle with.

  • Constantly questioning their own beliefs and values
  • Experiencing self-doubt and insecurity about their ability to convince others
  • Feeling a sense of responsibility to persuade others to their point of view
  • Being empathetic and understanding of others' perspectives
  • Feeling frustrated or discouraged when unable to convince others
  • Striving to be authentic and genuine in their arguments
  • Being open to changing their own mind if presented with compelling evidence or arguments
  • Feeling torn between different options or paths
  • Struggling to make decisions and stick to them

Emotions associated with being convincing

Here are some ideas for emotions your convincing character may experience.

  • Decisiveness
  • Assertiveness
  • Confidence
  • Eloquence
  • Charm
  • Conviction
  • Poise
  • Credibility
  • Persuasiveness

Facial expressions associated with being convincing

Here are some facial expressions your convincing character may exhibit.

  • Using assertive language
  • Steady eye contact
  • Raised eyebrows
  • Leaning slightly forward
  • Confident posture
  • Nodding in agreement
  • Gesturing with open palms
  • Clear enunciation and tone of voice
  • Relaxed smile

Body language associated with being convincing

Here is some body language your convincing character may exhibit.

  • Maintaining eye contact
  • Standing or sitting up straight
  • Speaking with a steady and clear voice
  • Avoiding fidgeting or nervous tics, such as tapping fingers or bouncing legs
  • Using pauses effectively to emphasize important points
  • Using open and expansive gestures, such as spreading arms wide or standing with hands on hips
  • Smiling or using a friendly tone to build rapport with the audience
  • Using confident gestures, such as pointing or nodding

For detailed feedback on convincing characters and other aspects of your writing, try ProWritingAid's fictional story assessment.

Behaviors associated with being convincing

Here are some behaviors your convincing character may exhibit.

  • Establishing credibility and authority on the subject
  • Being passionate and enthusiastic about the topic
  • Appealing to emotions and values
  • Speaking clearly and confidently
  • Anticipating objections and addressing them preemptively
  • Maintaining eye contact and good body language
  • Using persuasive language and rhetorical devices
  • Using facts and evidence to support arguments
  • Listening actively and responding thoughtfully to others' concerns

Growth and evolution of convincing characters

Here are some ways that your convincing character may grow and evolve over time.

  • Learning to trust themselves or others more
  • Overcoming a fear or weakness
  • Changing their perspective or worldview
  • Learning a new skill or gaining knowledge
  • Developing empathy or understanding for others
  • Letting go of past hurts or resentments
  • Facing a difficult challenge or obstacle
  • Becoming more confident or assertive
  • Taking responsibility for their actions
  • Making amends for past mistakes
  • Building stronger relationships with others
  • Discovering their true identity or purpose

Stereotypes of convincing characters to avoid

Try to avoid writing stereotypical convincing character like these examples.

  • The sidekick who is only there to provide comic relief
  • The stereotypical "tough guy" or "femme fatale" who relies solely on their physical prowess or sexuality.
  • The damsel in distress who needs to be saved by the hero
  • The overconfident character who never faces consequences for their actions
  • The passive character who never takes action or makes decisions on their own
  • The angry or aggressive character who is violent for no apparent reason
  • The one-dimensional villain who has no redeeming qualities
  • The stoic, emotionless character who never shows vulnerability or weakness
  • The all-knowing or perfect protagonist who always has the right answer
  • The love interest who has no depth beyond their relationship with the protagonist

Remember, a convincing character should be complex, multi-dimensional, and have both strengths and flaws. Avoiding these stereotypes can help writers create characters that feel more real and relatable to readers.

Negatives of being convincing

Here are some potential negatives of being convincing. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as positives depending on the context.

  • The pressure to always be convincing can create a sense of self-doubt and anxiety.
  • It may be difficult to maintain authenticity and sincerity when trying to convince others.
  • It can be challenging to convince those who hold strong opposing beliefs or values.
  • Being too convincing can come across as manipulative or deceitful.
  • Convincing others may require a lot of energy and effort, leading to burnout.

Positives of being convincing

Here are some potential positives of being convincing. Note: These are subjective and some might also be seen as negatives depending on the context.

  • Being able to negotiate effectively
  • Ability to inspire others towards a common goal
  • Good communication skills
  • Being able to adapt to different situations and audiences
  • The ability to persuade others to see your point of view
  • Confidence in your own ideas and beliefs
  • Strong leadership qualities

Verbal expressions of convincing characters

Here are some potential expressions used by convincing characters.

  • "Let me prove to you why this is the right choice."
  • "My track record speaks for itself."
  • "I am passionate about this topic and it shows in my argument."
  • "Trust me, I know what I'm talking about."
  • "You can count on me to deliver."
  • "I have evidence to back up my point."
  • "I understand your concerns, but let me explain why my perspective is better."
  • "I am confident in my ability to persuade you."

Relationships of convincing characters

Here are some ways that being convincing could affect your character's relationships.

  • They may have a competitive dynamic with others, always striving to be the most convincing person in the room.
  • They may have a tendency to dominate conversations and convince others to see things their way.
  • Convincing people may also have a manipulative quality that allows them to convince others to do things they may not want to do.
  • They may have a contentious dynamic with others, often arguing or debating to prove their point.
  • Convincing people may also have a charismatic quality that draws others to them and makes it easy for them to persuade.
  • Convincing people may have a persuasive dynamic with others.

Examples from books of characters who are convincing

  • Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins
  • Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • Jane Eyre from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Jay Gatsby from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Sherlock Holmes from the Sherlock Holmes series by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Huckleberry Finn from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  • Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Harry Potter from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Writing exercises for writing convincing characters

Here are some writing exercises you might try for learning to write convincing characters.

  • Start by identifying a character you want to develop with the Convincing trait. What motivates them? What do they believe in? What are their goals and desires?
  • Write a scene where your character has to persuade someone else to see things their way. This could be a conversation with a friend, an argument with an enemy, or a negotiation with a business partner. Focus on the language and tactics your character uses to convince the other person.
  • Write a scene where your character has to convince themselves of something they don't want to believe. This could be a harsh truth about themselves, a difficult decision they must make, or a belief they previously rejected.
  • Consider the consequences of your character's persuasive abilities. Write a scene where your character realizes they may have convinced someone to do something harmful or unethical. How do they react?
  • Choose a controversial topic and have your character take a strong stance on one side of the issue. Write a monologue where your character lays out their position and tries to persuade the reader to agree with them.
  • Write a scene where your character has to defend themselves against false accusations. How do they convince others of their innocence?
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