BlogHow to Use ProWritingAidEverything You Need to Know About the Clichés and Redundancies Report

Everything You Need to Know About the Clichés and Redundancies Report

How to Use The Clichés and Redundancies Check

George Orwell in his Rules of Writing said: "Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print." Be creative and come up with something fresh. A new analogy or metaphor will make much more of an impression on your readers than a dusty old cliché.

In this article, learn how to use ProWritingAid's Clichés and Redundancies Report to improve your work.

Contents:
  1. How to Use The Clichés and Redundancies Report
  2. Clichés
  3. Redundancies
  4. The Internet's Biggest List of Clichés and Redundancies

How to Use The Clichés and Redundancies Report

The Clichés and Redundancies Report scours your work for cliches and highlights them. Nobody likes to read a cliche—the phrasing is trite and boring.

Full size report

It can also remove redundant expressions as they say the same thing twice.

Clichés

Whenever you use a cliché, you are knowingly writing something unoriginal. Clichés are what you write when you don’t have the energy or inspiration to think of something new to say.

Writers often use clichés when they are working on their first draft because thinking up original wording takes time and can interrupt creative flow. That’s fine. But, when you go back to edit, be creative and brainstorm for fresh ideas. A new analogy or metaphor will make much more of an impression on your readers than a dusty old cliché. A good writer may create and reject over a dozen images before finding the right one, so don’t worry if it takes you a while.

Redundancies

Every word in your writing should be there for a reason. Redundant expressions make writing longer, not better. Look at these four examples:

  • She peered through the hollow tube.
  • He stepped out on the frozen ice.
  • She followed her natural instinct.
  • His writing was peppered with overused clichés.

In all four cases, the penultimate word is superfluous. Redundancies can happen across a sentence, too:

  • The problems first began when Gary lost his job.

The word began means “the first occurrence”, so the word "first" is redundant.

  • Sam, Tom and Susie gathered together around the fire.

The word gathered means “to come together”, so the word "together" is redundant.

  • He reversed the car back down the driveway.

As opposed to reversing it forward ? Drop the word back because it’s redundant. Redundancies add quantity, not quality. Eliminate the clutter.

Use ProWritingAid’s Cliché and Redundancy Check to highlight those that have crept into your writing.

The Internet's Biggest List of Clichés and Redundancies

Want to see more examples of clichés? We've compiled hundreds in:

The Internet's Biggest List of Clichés

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Hayley Milliman
Content Lead

Hayley is thrilled to be ProWritingAid's Content Lead, as it gives her an excuse to think deeply about words every single day. Prior to joining ProWritingAid, Hayley spent a number of years as an elementary school teacher, which was a crash course in learning how to entertain an indifferent audience. These days, she puts her storytelling skills to use writing blog articles and working on her first novel.

When Hayley isn't hunched over her keyboard, you can find her figure skating at the ice rink or hiking with her dog.

She is the co-author of the book Museum Hack's Guide to History's Fiercest Females (which was an Amazon bestseller) and How to Build Your Author Platform on a Shoestring.

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