Grammar GuideSpellingWhat is the difference between 'as' and 'has'?

What is the difference between 'as' and 'has'?

What is the difference between 'as' and 'has'?

The words as and has are often confused because they are easy to mistype. We'll help you to understand the difference.

As means like or in the capacity of when used as a preposition.

As is also used as an adverb. It means to such an extent or degree.

Has means the present tense third-person singular form of have when used as a verb.

A good way to remember the difference is He HAS hamburgers--these all start with H.

Out of the two words, 'as' is the most common. It appears about three times more frequently than 'has'.



As and has are easy to mistype and misuse because they look similar. Here are the differences.

As has many meanings and functions as several parts of speech. As a conjunction, it functions similarly to like or in the capacity as. When used as a preposition, as means in the condition or role of (she works as a teacher). As can also be an adverb that means to the same degree or amount. These are just a few uses of as.

Has is the third-person singular form of the verb have in the present tense.

Which is right ', as well as' or ', has well has'?

The correct expression is ', as well as'. These phrases are often confused because they look similar.

Should I use ', as well as' or ', has well has'?

The right expression is ', as well as'. These phrases are often confused because they have a similar spelling.

Is the right expression 'as well as the' or 'has well has the'?

The correct expression is 'as well as the'. These phrases are often confused because they have a similar spelling.

Which is correct 'as well as the' or 'has well has the'?

The right expression is 'as well as the'. These phrases are often confused because they look similar.

Is the expression 'as a result of' or 'has a result of'?

The correct expression is 'as a result of'. These phrases are often confused because they look similar.

Should I use ', it has been' or ', it as been'?

The right phrase is ', it has been'. These phrases are often confused because they are easy to mistype.

Should I use 'has nothing to do' or 'as nothing to do'?

The right phrase is 'has nothing to do'. These phrases are often confused because they appear similar.

Which is correct 'has been shown to' or 'as been shown to'?

The correct expression is 'has been shown to'. These phrases are often confused because they appear similar.

Should I use 'there has been a' or 'there as been a'?

You should use 'there has been a'. These phrases are often confused because they have a similar spelling.

Should I use ', which has been' or ', which as been'?

You should use ', which has been'. These phrases are often confused because they look similar.

Some synonyms of as are: equally, like, while, because, whereas.

Some synonyms of has are: acquires, accepts, owns, experiences, accepts.

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The definitions in this article were adapted from Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster.

Dictionary Definition of asDictionary Definition of has

Examples of as in a sentence

As always, I have taken a high and free hand with the geography of Alaska.
- Nothing gold can stay by Dana Stabenow
The army moved against Katakor, Jenno, and Delchin, as well as Pallia.
- Demon Lord of Karanda by David Eddings
The airport described in Las Vegas doesn’t exist as envisioned here.
- Touch of Darkness by C. T. Adams; Cathy Clamp
How could she come to such a human thing as caring, any more?
- The wandering fire by Guy Gavriel Kay
Lucy got up to look for a dictionary as her phone rang.
- The Replacement Child by Christine Barber

Examples of has in a sentence

I bet Duff has a whole case of the fizzy stuff for you kids."
- The heart of Devin MacKade by Nora Roberts
Since then she has won numerous awards, including a career achievement award for romantic suspense.
- Secret Weapon Spouse by B. J. Daniels
A heavenly lather that’s soft enough for the tub, but still has muscle for the toughest—”
- The Hound of Rowan by Henry H. Neff
It has an interesting connection to criminal lore.
- In the night room: a novel by Peter Straub
People who act against the State are enemies of the State, and the State has no room for enemies.
- From Russia with love: a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming