NaNoWriMo For Beginners: Write a Novel In 30 Days

NaNoWriMo For Beginners: Write a Novel In 30 Days

Are you taking on NaNoWriMo for the first time this November? Read our eight tips and tricks to find out what you can expect and how to prepare.

Read more
4 Great Novel-Writing Apps That Are Totally Free

4 Great Novel-Writing Apps That Are Totally Free

If you think a fancy novel-writing app costs too much money, you're in luck. We've got four awesome programs for authors that are totally free!

Read more
Editing Your Own Writing

Editing Your Own Writing

Editing is integral to good writing. A good self-edit can take your book from good to great, so it's really worth doing. If you're wondering how to make the editing process go as smoothly as possible, you won't want to miss this episode of The Rebel Author Podcast with ProWritingAid!

Read more
The Roadmap to Novel Writing Success!

The Roadmap to Novel Writing Success!

Writing a novel is a long, hard slog, but following this roadmap will help you to avoid wasted time staring at blank screens, going down blind alleys and writing dozens of scenes that have no place in the final novel. Get started today!

Read more
How to Enrich Your Story With World-Building

How to Enrich Your Story With World-Building

Your characters need a place for the story to unfold. It can’t happen in limbo. Even if the world looks like your own, it’s still essential to build it for your reader. Here are our tips for getting started with world-building.

Read more
4 Important Ways to Get Ready for NaNoWriMo

4 Important Ways to Get Ready for NaNoWriMo

***Are you ready for NaNoWriMo?*** It’s the question most asked this time of year, right before National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) that takes over the month of November every year. If this is your first time doing NaNoWriMo, don’t stress out too much about it. It’s a huge learning process where you’ll discover what’s most important for you to be able to produce content on a continual basis to move forward towards your end goal of 50,000 words in 30 days. The biggest lesson I’ve learned over the years is that it’s not so much about the end result. What you have at the end of 30 days will in no shape or form be a novel ready to print. Depending on your genre, novels can be 80,000 words and up. Just understand: you won’t be finished with it on November 30th.

Read more
Writing App Reviews… Scrivener

Writing App Reviews… Scrivener

As a writer, I’d heard about Scrivener from many of my peers, but for whatever reason (pure obstinance, probably), I stuck with my old word processing program. It wasn’t until about a year ago that I finally acquiesced and purchased Scrivener. I haven’t looked back! If you’ve ever set up a binder to try to organize the various plans and ideas for your novel—or even just articles—you probably had sections to hold your character sketches, setting ideas, plot outline, and research. You may have had separate sections to contain each of your scenes and chapters. You might even have had a section that contained nothing but pictures clipped from magazines that sparked your imagination.

Read more
How to Improve Your Story Arc and Give Your Character Depth

How to Improve Your Story Arc and Give Your Character Depth

You’ve survived yet another NaNoWriMo. Congratulations! You’ve just written a book in 30 days. Now what? Kathy Edens tackles this question.

Read more
You've Completed NaNoWriMo: What Comes Next?

You've Completed NaNoWriMo: What Comes Next?

It’s time to burst your bubble. Sorry! The typical paperback novel is between 80,000 and 100,000 words long. Yes, you completed 50,000 words, and that’s an amazing achievement in 30 days. But 50,000 words does not a novel make. Here's what you need to know about life after NaNoWriMo...

Read more
How to Write a Novel: Six Tried and Tested Methods

How to Write a Novel: Six Tried and Tested Methods

In this post, Kathy Edens introduces us to six of the most popular novel-writing methods out there: 1) The Snowflake Method, 2) The 30-Day Method, 3) The 5-Step Method, 4) The Write From The Middle Method, 5) The 5-Draft Method, 6) The Novel Factory Methods. The best method is the one that speaks to you. It’s the one that you’ll commit to and use to start writing your novel. But more importantly, it’s the one that will help see you through to the end. Only you can decide what’s the best method for you because every writer is different with different needs and motivations. Choose what works best for you. Or experiment with different methods to find the one that helps you be your most productive ever.

Read more
All About the 25 ProWritingAid Reports

All About the 25 ProWritingAid Reports

ProWritingAid analyzes your writing and presents its findings in 25 different reports. Each user will have their own writing strengths and weaknesses and so different reports will appeal to different people. Remember, all the software can do is highlight potential pitfalls in your writing. It's up to you, the writer, to decide which suggestions work within your specific context, and which ones should be ignored.

Read more
Writing App Reviews…Rough Draft

Writing App Reviews…Rough Draft

We love technology at ProWritingAid and how it helps writers improve. Over the past few months, we’ve been checking out some of the best writing technology out there. We've already reviewed Scrivener, The Novel Factory, Ulysses, and ILYS, this month we look at a new app called Rough Draft.

Read more
Writing App Reviews … ilys

Writing App Reviews … ilys

I’d heard about ilys, this amazing online program that lets you only see one letter at a time of the words you’re typing. You can’t see what you’ve already said, which helps you focus instead on what you’re going to say. This puts you in the flow. It lets your creativity jump ahead of your internal editor and crank out the words without worrying about typos and spelling errors. All you see as you write is the last letter you typed...

Read more
The Geek Writer:  Using Technology to Self-Publish Your Novel

The Geek Writer: Using Technology to Self-Publish Your Novel

After a painstaking process of planning, writing, and editing your work, it’s time to consider publishing it. For most writers, this is the most exciting and fear-inspiring task (possibly a greater heart-stopping experience than editing alone). Your work will be on display for public consumption, and you want to ensure it’s the best work possible. If you’ve decided to join the ranks of the intrepid self-published authors, then you have one—and only one—person you can rely on: yourself. Back before we tech-savvy geeky writers existed, self-publishing was considered vain and a bit silly, and your work wasn’t taken seriously. David Wong, with his novel, *John Dies at the End*, broke that stereotype of the self-published novelist, and here we are. Now, traditional publishers are nervous (and rightly so) due to the wonderful world of technology.

Read more
Create Compelling & Evocative Scenes

Create Compelling & Evocative Scenes

Scenes are the rising and falling action, and the soft moments in between, that move your story forward. They have a couple of basic purposes: - They establish time and place. They give the reader a marker on where and when things are happening. - They help develop character. Even if the scene is pure action, you learn about the character’s motivations by his or her decisions, choices, and actions. - They let characters set goals. Without goals to achieve, characters have no reason to act or emote. Readers want to know what’s at stake. - They allow the action to rise or fall. This movement is what carries your reader forward. - They let you crank up the conflict. Without conflict, you won’t have tension. And without tension, your story is boring.

Read more
Writing Resources
Subscribe for writing hacks, special offers and free stuff
We will not share your details

Grammar Guide

Learn everything you need to know about grammar.

Improve your grammar

Great Writing, Made Easier.

A grammar checker, style editor, and writing mentor in one package.

Try it for free today.

Sign up