Building a World Within a World: Worldbuilding and Historical Fiction

Building a World Within a World: Worldbuilding and Historical Fiction

Good stories require an immersive world to plunge readers into. If you're writing historical fiction, you'll need to pay attention to historical accuracy to ground your characters' relationships, motivations, and conflicts. In this article, author Caroline Jackson shows us how.

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Punch Up Your Narrative Arc and Character Development

Punch Up Your Narrative Arc and Character Development

You’ve survived yet another NaNoWriMo. Congratulations! You’ve just written a book in 30 days. Now what? Kathy Edens tackles this question.

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What's After NaNoWriMo?

What's After NaNoWriMo?

It’s time to burst your bubble. Sorry! The typical paperback novel is between 80,000 and 100,000 words long. Yes, you completed 50,000 words, and that’s an amazing achievement in 30 days. But 50,000 words does not a novel make. The beauty of NaNoWriMo is that it releases you from worrying about what you’re writing, trying to make it perfect, and instead you just focus on getting words down on the page. And that is a serious accomplishment: 50,000 words in 30 days. NaNoWriMo hopefully taught you that when you’re not seeking perfection, you can get an amazing amount of words out instead of staring at a blank page. So, sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you’ve likely got more work ahead on that novel of yours. Here's what you need to know...

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How to Foreshadow like Alfred Hitchcock

How to Foreshadow like Alfred Hitchcock

Foreshadowing allows you to plant clues, hint at what’s to come, build the tension, or even place a red herring in your reader’s path. You can use foreshadowing in a variety of ways. The resulting action can be immediate or delayed. You can use dialogue or narrative to set the scene, and you can foreshadow a symbolic event or an ethical dilemma. You can use direct or indirect foreshadowing, and it can even be true or false. Foreshadowing can feed the tension of a scene. Who doesn’t know the famous shower scene in the movie Psycho? Right before the character Marion Crane pulls up to the Bates Motel, her windshield wipers are slashing through the rain, foreshadowing what awaits her in the shower scene.

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How to Balance Surprise and Suspense in Your Novel

How to Balance Surprise and Suspense in Your Novel

Learn the difference between surprise and suspense and how to use them in your story. In this article, writer Zara Altair breaks down when and where to use each.

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How to Master the Plot Points that Matter

How to Master the Plot Points that Matter

Even if your writing is stellar and your characters are engaging, your novel will fall flat if you don't master these five key plot points.

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Agent Advice Part 2: Line-Editing and Copy-Editing

Agent Advice Part 2: Line-Editing and Copy-Editing

Literary agents are the gatekeepers of the publishing world. Their verdict on a five-page submission can make or break an author’s dreams. It’s critical to ensure your submission catches an agent’s eye and doesn’t immediately get passed upon.

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How to Write an Allegory like George Orwell

How to Write an Allegory like George Orwell

An allegory is a story that evokes two separate meanings. The first meaning is the story's surface, like characters and plot, the stuff that goes into every story. But at a much deeper level, an allegory has a symbolic, heavy meaning. What allegories come to mind? Maybe _The Lord of the Flies_; _The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe_; _Moby Dick_; or _Pilgrim's Progress_?

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How to Write a Mind-Blowing Plot Twist Like Gone Girl

How to Write a Mind-Blowing Plot Twist Like Gone Girl

As an author, don’t you want to create the mind-blowing plot twist that leaves readers begging you to write more books? Maybe the kind that result in big movie deals… Wait. If your writing is a means to an end, it’s doubtful your plot twist will make the big bang needed to get on the big screen. Because you can’t force a plot twist; readers will smell it a mile away. Do it authentically and you’ll create a feverish tension that keeps readers turning the pages to see how this new twist will play out next. Or you’ll end on a final piece of information that changes everything, resonating with readers long after the last page. Here’s how it works.

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Do You Know the Most Important Role of Your Supporting Characters?

Do You Know the Most Important Role of Your Supporting Characters?

Supporting characters are designed to move your story forward. Discover their relationship to story context and how that influences the way you write them.

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How to Use Trello to Storyboard Your Novel

How to Use Trello to Storyboard Your Novel

You may have noticed that we at ProWritingAid have a fondness for technology that makes writers better, stronger, more organized, and highly productive. If you like creating a storyboard for your novels, or if you want an innovative app to capture all of your to-do’s for your client work, let us introduce Trello. For those of us who use sticky notes, index cards, and other forms of reminders to help you organize everything you need for a writing project, Trello is the easiest, most intuitive way to organize your work.

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 Supercharge Your Author Career with a Series

Supercharge Your Author Career with a Series

Creating a series can boost your author career and simplify your novel writing. You’ll create benefits as a writer and increase your marketing power. Author Zara Altair offers tips on writing a series.

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Six Tried and Tested Methods for Writing a Novel

Six Tried and Tested Methods for Writing a Novel

In this post, Kathy Edens introduces us to six of the most popular novel-writing methods out there: 1) The Snowflake Method, 2) The 30-Day Method, 3) The 5-Step Method, 4) The Write From The Middle Method, 5) The 5-Draft Method, 6) The Novel Factory Methods. The best method is the one that speaks to you. It’s the one that you’ll commit to and use to start writing your novel. But more importantly, it’s the one that will help see you through to the end. Only you can decide what’s the best method for you because every writer is different with different needs and motivations. Choose what works best for you. Or experiment with different methods to find the one that helps you be your most productive ever.

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Advice from Kurt Vonnegut that Every Writer Needs to Read

Advice from Kurt Vonnegut that Every Writer Needs to Read

Kurt Vonnegut, author of such classics as *Slaughterhouse Five* and *Breakfast of Champions*, stands today as one of the 20th century’s most important American writers. I can’t think of anyone better placed to give literary advice, and, thankfully, he agreed with me. These eight tips were originally written by Vonnegut to apply exclusively to writers of short stories, but I reckon they’re just as useful for writers of longer fiction.

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Does Your Story Need an Epilogue?

Does Your Story Need an Epilogue?

To epilogue or not to epilogue – that is the question. Should you use an epilogue to wrap up your story, or is that just overkill? We discuss.

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