Articles about grammar

Find inconsistencies in your writing

by ProWritingAid Jun 18, 2018

Find inconsistencies in your writing

If inconsistencies plague your writing, your work can seem unpolished and unprofessional. ProWritingAid helps find and identify such errors automatically.

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Amazing Alliteration in Tongue Twisters

by ProWritingAid Jun 18, 2018

Amazing Alliteration in Tongue Twisters

Tongue twisters are a great way to illustrate the idea of alliteration. In fact, the term "tongue twister" is a great example of alliteration in itself!

We've created a practice sheet of some of our favorite alliterative tongue twisters.

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7 Grammar Rules the Best Writers Break

by ProWritingAid Jun 18, 2018

7 Grammar Rules the Best Writers Break

In life, writers must obey a single rule: write for your audience. If you’re writing fiction, your dialogue must be natural. So you write in conversational English, which is less than grammatical at times. And if you’re writing for academia or other stuffy audiences, your prose must be formal.

If you’ve learned the many rules of English usage and are adept at wielding them properly, feel free to break these seven rules now and then.

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10 Websites to Help Improve Your Grammar

by Hayley Milliman Jun 06, 2018

10 Websites to Help Improve Your Grammar

Learning grammar doesn't have to be difficult! With these free tools, you'll be mastering your comma usage in no time.

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Me or I: Setting the Record Straight

by Justin Cox Jun 01, 2018

Me or I: Setting the Record Straight

When to use “me” instead of “I” is an important rule to learn. Selecting the wrong pronoun will ruin your writing and turn readers against you. Unlike “who” vs. “whom”, learning when to use “me” or “I” is very easy to learn.

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3 Awful Oxford Comma Bloopers

by Gregory Heilers Jun 01, 2018

3 Awful Oxford Comma Bloopers

Are you a staunch defender or opposer of the Oxford comma? Regardless of where you stand, these three tales of Oxford comma woe will make you think twice the next time you debate the little mark's usage.

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Let’s Get Possessive

by Justin Cox May 19, 2018

Let’s Get Possessive

Defining possessive nouns is tricky. There are several unique rules that can confuse even the most seasoned writer.

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The Apostrophe: When to Use It and When to Avoid It

by Liz McMahon May 19, 2018

The Apostrophe: When to Use It and When to Avoid It

The apostrophe, when used correctly, can add clarity to a piece of writing. But when misused, the results can be confusing. We take a look at getting it right.

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Which Should You Use: Home or Hone?

by ProWritingAid May 19, 2018

Which Should You Use: Home or Hone?

People sometimes think they can use "home in on" and "hone in on" interchangeably, but the truth is much more gray. Let’s look at when to use each.

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Commonly Misspelled Words

by ProWritingAid May 15, 2018

Commonly Misspelled Words

Here at ProWritingAid, we have discovered that our editing tool catches the same words over and over again!

Even the best writers have those words that they just can’t seem to get right.

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To ‘to’ or not to ’too’: that is the question!

by Justin Cox May 09, 2018

To ‘to’ or not to ’too’: that is the question!

Getting tripped up on the differences between “to” and “too” happens often. When do you use a single “o” and when do you use two? While this is one of the most common grammar mistakes, the rule is easy to master.

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Repeating Yourself is Redundant: or, A Pleonasm For Your Thoughts?

by Justin Cox Apr 30, 2018

Repeating Yourself is Redundant: or, A Pleonasm For Your Thoughts?

Pleonasms are common in speech but should be avoided at all costs. Do you have what it takes to diagnose and eliminate them from your writing?

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Know Your Acronyms

by Justin Cox Apr 30, 2018

Know Your Acronyms

While acronyms add a colloquial flair to writing, they are easy to misuse. If we’re not careful, improper usage will cause readers to cringe in pain.

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To vs. Too vs. Two

by Hayley Milliman Apr 20, 2018

To vs. Too vs. Two

To, too, two. We teach you how to decide which of these pesky little words to use in specific situations.

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Than vs. Then

by Hayley Milliman Apr 20, 2018

Than vs. Then

"Then" and "than" are two pesky words that sound alike but have very different meanings. We explore when to use each term.

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Why an Editing Tool is Like a Hovering Librarian

by Kathy Edens Mar 28, 2018

Why an Editing Tool is Like a Hovering Librarian

Imagine a kindly, bespectacled woman with fresh, minty breath hovering over your shoulder as you pour words out on the screen. Her critical task is to help you make every word choice the best and to guide you to clearer, more concise sentences. She has your literary best interests at heart.

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Using Adverbs: An Easy Guide

by Kathy Edens Mar 28, 2018

Using Adverbs: An Easy Guide

Here’s the truth about adverbs. They aren’t inherently good or bad: it’s all in how you use them. Let’s unpack when you should—and shouldn’t—use adverbs.

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When it’s Right to be Wrong

by Dr. Marlene Caroselli Mar 14, 2018

When it’s Right to be Wrong

The definition of grace, as ascribed to Jacqueline Kennedy, is making others feel comfortable.

We don’t typically associate “grace” and “grammar,” but there are those occasions when it’s perfectly acceptable to be grammatically incorrect. To do otherwise may make you appear elitist.

This article looks at correct usage of pronouns and prepositions, followed by a quick glance at those instances when, grammatically speaking, it’s right to be wrong.

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It’s vs. Its: Let’s Get It Straight

by ProWritingAid Mar 06, 2018

It’s vs. Its: Let’s Get It Straight

Contractions. Possessives. When do you use an apostrophe? Follow these rules on it’s versus its and self-edit with confidence.

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Spice Up Your Writing

by Dr. Marlene Caroselli Mar 02, 2018

Spice Up Your Writing

Variety, as we all know, is the spice of life. It’s also the spice of good writing. There’s an easy way to find out if your sentences have variety. Take a paragraph you’ve written—one of eight or so sentences. Then, write down the first word in each sentence. Next, identify the part of speech for each word. If most of your sentences begin with the same part of speech, you don’t have variety. It’s as simple as that.

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