How to Go from First Draft to Published Author (free eBook!)

How to Go from First Draft to Published Author (free eBook!)

For a limited time, download our newest eBook, How to Go from First Draft to Published Author!

Read more
Six Tried and Tested Methods for Writing a Novel

Six Tried and Tested Methods for Writing a Novel

In this post, Kathy Edens introduces us to six of the most popular novel-writing methods out there: 1) The Snowflake Method, 2) The 30-Day Method, 3) The 5-Step Method, 4) The Write From The Middle Method, 5) The 5-Draft Method, 6) The Novel Factory Methods. The best method is the one that speaks to you. It’s the one that you’ll commit to and use to start writing your novel. But more importantly, it’s the one that will help see you through to the end. Only you can decide what’s the best method for you because every writer is different with different needs and motivations. Choose what works best for you. Or experiment with different methods to find the one that helps you be your most productive ever.

Read more
Advice from Kurt Vonnegut that Every Writer Needs to Read

Advice from Kurt Vonnegut that Every Writer Needs to Read

Kurt Vonnegut, author of such classics as *Slaughterhouse Five* and *Breakfast of Champions*, stands today as one of the 20th century’s most important American writers. I can’t think of anyone better placed to give literary advice, and, thankfully, he agreed with me. These eight tips were originally written by Vonnegut to apply exclusively to writers of short stories, but I reckon they’re just as useful for writers of longer fiction.

Read more
Holding Back Your Backstory

Holding Back Your Backstory

Many readers struggle to figure out how much backstory is too much. DailyWritingTips explores this topic on their blog.

Read more
What is the Snowflake Writing Method?

What is the Snowflake Writing Method?

Is the snowflake novel-writing method right for you? Here's why it's worth a try.

Read more
How to Nail Third-Person Narrative

How to Nail Third-Person Narrative

Who here likes to play God? Do you enjoy making your characters dance like a puppet on a string? Or do you agonize over every twist of the screw you make that ratchets the tension? If you answered yes to the puppeteer role, you probably like writing in the third-person omniscient point of view.

Read more
Finding Your Unique Authorial Voice

Finding Your Unique Authorial Voice

Every author has a unique voice. It's just a matter of finding it. In this article, fantasy writer Kyle Massa offers his tips on how to discover your authorial voice.

Read more
How to Use the Three-Act Structure to Actually Finish Writing Your Novel

How to Use the Three-Act Structure to Actually Finish Writing Your Novel

The secret to the plotting success of countless famous stories lies in the three-act structure, which effectively breaks a story into a beginning, middle, and an end. But the three-act structure is so much more than that: it gives your writing a framework that directs you while still giving you ample room for creativity and new ideas. In this article, we examine how to use the three-act story structure.

Read more
22 Storytelling Techniques from Pixar

22 Storytelling Techniques from Pixar

If you've ever seen "Up" or "Toy Story," you know that the team of writers over at Pixar can spin a great story. With that in mind, we examine former Pixar employee Emma Coats' storytelling tips.

Read more
Turn Your First Draft Into a Story Readers Love

Turn Your First Draft Into a Story Readers Love

How do you create a story that your readers will love from your first draft? Your top three considerations should be character, plot, and setting.

Read more
Fiction Archetypes that Sell Like Wildfire

Fiction Archetypes that Sell Like Wildfire

Fiction writers don't start from scratch. They can utilize existing character and story archetypes, personality and emotional types, and the goals and the fears of each type. Combining them in a strong storyline is almost a guarantee for creating best-selling works.

Read more
Writing Characters & Making Decisions: "What Kind of Story Are You Telling?"

Writing Characters & Making Decisions: "What Kind of Story Are You Telling?"

Let’s take a look at the four types of stories that Orson Scott Card says comprises every novel. He uses the acronym "MICE", which stands for milieu, idea, character, event. Within this framework, Card argues something deeply contoversial: not all novels require in-depth characterization.

Read more
How to Write Historical Fiction (without a history degree)

How to Write Historical Fiction (without a history degree)

If you are an HF writer, hats off to you! I learned haters will find the smallest discrepancy in your writing and crow it from the rooftops. Perhaps HF writers have extra thick skin. Whatever their impetus, they don’t necessarily have a love of history per se—and certainly don’t need a degree. They find either a period, an event, or historical person thoroughly interesting and decide to dig deeper.

Read more
Belief, Emotional Involvement, Clarity: What Every Character Needs

Belief, Emotional Involvement, Clarity: What Every Character Needs

We’re continuing our monthly installment series on creating amazing characters using Orson Scott Card’s seminal book, Elements of Fiction Writing: Characters & Viewpoint. This month, we cover the three elements every characters needs and why you must deliver.

Read more
Inventing Characters: A Character is What He Does, His Motives, and His Past

Inventing Characters: A Character is What He Does, His Motives, and His Past

Characters in books give us insight into the human condition. We learn how people behave and what’s in human nature from our favorite characters in books and on the big screen. Orson Scott Card says out of the multiple ways to get to know someone, the most powerful and the ones that make the strongest impression are: - What your character does - What his or her motives are - What they’ve done in the past Let’s look at these and a few other ways of getting to know your characters.

Read more
Writing Resources
Subscribe for writing hacks, special offers and free stuff
We will not share your details

Grammar Guide

Learn everything you need to know about grammar.

Improve your grammar

Great Writing, Made Easier.

A grammar checker, style editor, and writing mentor in one package.

Try it for free today.

Sign up