Gone Girl's Plot Twist: How to Write Your Own

Gone Girl's Plot Twist: How to Write Your Own

As an author, don’t you want to create the mind-blowing plot twist that leaves readers begging you to write more books? Do it authentically and you’ll create a feverish tension that keeps readers turning the pages to see how this new twist will play out next. Or you’ll end on a final piece of information that changes everything, resonating with readers long after the last page. Here’s how it works.

Read more
How to Avoid Common Plot Pitfalls

How to Avoid Common Plot Pitfalls

Sometimes it’s hard to see plot problems while you’re writing and you don’t notice them until the end. This will send some writers into a downward spiral of negative self-talk. Others will white-knuckle their way through half-hearted revisions. Here are a few common plot pitfalls and what you can do to rectify them.

Read more
Why Every Heroine Does Not Need a Love Interest

Why Every Heroine Does Not Need a Love Interest

There are almost no authors writing female characters that don't depend on a romance subplot to carry a book. That's because the Hero's Journey, Campbell's famous framework for the classic tale of a hero on a quest, doesn't work well for a female protagonist.

Read more
Is Show, Don't Tell Good Advice?

Is Show, Don't Tell Good Advice?

Is "show, don't tell" useful writing advice? Author Kyle A. Massa goes deep on the subject in this article.

Read more
How Weather Affects Fiction

How Weather Affects Fiction

Is weather one of the most under-utilized facets of fiction? In this article, speculative fiction author Kyle A. Massa explores several ways to use it in your work.

Read more
Building a World Within a World: Worldbuilding and Historical Fiction

Building a World Within a World: Worldbuilding and Historical Fiction

Good stories require an immersive world to plunge readers into. If you're writing historical fiction, you'll need to pay attention to historical accuracy to ground your characters' relationships, motivations, and conflicts. In this article, author Hayley Milliman shows us how.

Read more
The Eagle Problem: How Writers Can Balance Magical Elements in Stories

The Eagle Problem: How Writers Can Balance Magical Elements in Stories

Powerful magic is fun in theory, but it can ruin the logic of your plot. Kyle A. Massa covers one of the most infamous examples of this issue and the lessons authors can learn from it.

Read more
How to Improve Your Story Arc and Give Your Character Depth

How to Improve Your Story Arc and Give Your Character Depth

You’ve survived yet another NaNoWriMo. Congratulations! You’ve just written a book in 30 days. Now what? Kathy Edens tackles this question.

Read more
How to Effectively Show Emotion in Characters

How to Effectively Show Emotion in Characters

If you consider yourself an unemotional person, you might wonder how you can become an emotional master in your writing. The secret? Music.

Read more
A Literary Agent Shares the Etiquette of the Editorial Process

A Literary Agent Shares the Etiquette of the Editorial Process

The relationship between writer and editor, or writer and literary agent, is complex. In order to work well together, both parties must work collaboratively. In this post, literary agent Mark Gottlieb shares his experience about how to make that relationship work best for everyone.

Read more
Foreshadowing Tips from Alfred Hitchcock

Foreshadowing Tips from Alfred Hitchcock

Foreshadowing allows you to plant clues, hint at what’s to come, build the tension, or even place a red herring in your reader’s path. You can use foreshadowing in a variety of ways. The resulting action can be immediate or delayed. You can use dialogue or narrative to set the scene, and you can foreshadow a symbolic event or an ethical dilemma. You can use direct or indirect foreshadowing, and it can even be true or false. Foreshadowing can feed the tension of a scene. Who doesn’t know the famous shower scene in the movie Psycho? Right before the character Marion Crane pulls up to the Bates Motel, her windshield wipers are slashing through the rain, foreshadowing what awaits her in the shower scene.

Read more
3 Things I Learned About Writing From The Final Season of Game of Thrones

3 Things I Learned About Writing From The Final Season of Game of Thrones

Millions of fans are not thrilled with the ending of 'Game of Thrones'. Hayley Milliman examines what lessons aspiring fiction writers can learn from the show's missteps.

Read more
ProWritingAid for copyediting, Fictionary for developmental editing.

ProWritingAid for copyediting, Fictionary for developmental editing.

Fictionary works seamlessly with the ProWritingAid Chrome extension. Not only can you use both to improve your work at the same time, but there's a special offer on the Fictionary and ProWritingAid bundle: get both for just $99 until May 27th.

Read more
What are Omnipotent Characters? And Why are They Problematic in Stories?

What are Omnipotent Characters? And Why are They Problematic in Stories?

When Proxima Midnight stabbed Vision, it wasn't a random development. It was good writing. Authors often sideline omnipotent characters to give the rest of their cast a chance. In this article, we examine what omnipotent characters are and how to use them.

Read more
How to Create a Fictional Universe Like the MCU

How to Create a Fictional Universe Like the MCU

Want to create a fictional universe like Marvel's? You've come to the right place.

Read more
Writing Resources
Subscribe for writing hacks, special offers and free stuff
We will not share your details

Grammar Guide

Learn everything you need to know about grammar.

Improve your grammar

Great Writing, Made Easier.

A grammar checker, style editor, and writing mentor in one package.

Try it for free today.

Sign up