Articles about writing style

How to Use Satire Like Mark Twain

by Kathy Edens Sep 21, 2017

How to Use Satire Like Mark Twain

Writers who use satire to get their point across do so by wielding humor, wit, irony, or sarcasm. They expose an individual or society for its weaknesses, corruption, hypocrisy, or foolishness. And no one does it better than Mark Twain.

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Why You Need to Master Storytelling to Become a Great Copywriter

by Kathy Edens Sep 21, 2017

Why You Need to Master Storytelling to Become a Great Copywriter

Good stories move people to action. They create sympathy, which opens up wallets for donations. Or a good story can start a revolution. At the least, a good story is memorable and influences your readers enough to sell. Just like a great fiction story, when you use a story in your content, you're actually putting your reader in the driver's seat so they can envision themselves having/using your product or service.

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Why You Need to Break Up With Your Muse

by Kathy Edens Sep 21, 2017

Why You Need to Break Up With Your Muse

Writing isn't magic. There's no fairy godmother called "Muse" who comes to you and waves her magic pen to fill your head with ideas and words. It's hard work, and you must sit in front of the computer or grab pen and paper and get your work done.

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How to Write an Allegory Like George Orwell

by Kathy Edens Sep 18, 2017

How to Write an Allegory Like George Orwell

An allegory is a story that evokes two separate meanings. The first meaning is the story's surface, like characters and plot, the stuff that goes into every story. But at a much deeper level, an allegory has a symbolic, heavy meaning.

What allegories come to mind? Maybe The Lord of the Flies; The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe; Moby Dick; or Pilgrim's Progress?

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How to Create a CV like Elon Musk's for Your Protagonist

by Kathy Edens Aug 02, 2017

How to Create a CV like Elon Musk's for Your Protagonist

A CV is a tool to capture all of your thoughts about your main character and keep track of the many idiosyncrasies and character traits. Just as important, it helps you capture and record the intertwined relationships of all the characters in your novel. Especially if you use several points of view or have multiple main characters, you need to capture them each distinctly.

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How to Create an Anti-Hero Like Homer Simpson

by Kathy Edens Aug 02, 2017

How to Create an Anti-Hero Like Homer Simpson

Homer Simpson has only one focus in this world: himself. He has some pretty unlikable characteristics, I'm sure everyone can agree. Why do we love to hate Homer and hate to love him so much? Because he's a well-done anti-hero, that's why.

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The Nitty Gritty Practical Guide to Giving your Characters Unique Voice

by Katja L Kaine Jul 17, 2017

The Nitty Gritty Practical Guide to Giving your Characters Unique Voice

Character Voice is as difficult to pin down as it is critical.

Plenty of writing advice resources talk about the importance of your main characters each having a unique voice, but how do you achieve that?

The main problem is that all of those characters are essentially coming from the same mind – yours – so you need to find ways to ensure your personal characteristics, speech patterns and nuances don’t all bleed into your characters.

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How to Create Mood Like Edgar Allan Poe

by Kathy Edens Jul 14, 2017

How to Create Mood Like Edgar Allan Poe

The master of Gothic horror stories, Edgar Allan Poe could set the tone of anything with a few chosen words. Here's how he did it.

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Why You Should Throw Your Main Character Under a Bus

by Kathy Edens Jul 05, 2017

Why You Should Throw Your Main Character Under a Bus

What is it about a great story that keeps you turning the pages? Think of the last book you devoured in one sitting. What kept you so engrossed you had to stay up until 4am to finish it?

For those of us who sit bleary-eyed in front of a computer because we couldn't put a good book down last night, we stumbled across an author who knows how to raise the stakes.

And the higher the stakes, the better—am I right?

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When Symbolism Goes Too Far

by Kathy Edens Jun 19, 2017

When Symbolism Goes Too Far

Are we hard-wired to seek symbolism in everything from our literature to our everyday life? Spirituality is rife with symbolism, advertisers use symbols to sell their products, and we interpret a smile from someone as a symbol of friendship.

Symbolism in literature uses an object or a word to represent something abstract in your work. A person, an action, a place, a single word, or an object can have symbolic meaning. Symbolism, done well, allows you to hint at a certain mood or emotion instead of showing it.

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Me Write Pretty One Day: Why Purple Prose Kills the Clarity of Your Content

by Kathy Edens Jun 19, 2017

Me Write Pretty One Day: Why Purple Prose Kills the Clarity of Your Content

Great content needs to be more than just "pretty". It needs depth and insight. It needs to avoid purple prose not like the plague, but because it is the plague.

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Using an Editing Tool Does Not Make You a Lazy Writer

by Kathy Edens Jun 12, 2017

Using an Editing Tool Does Not Make You a Lazy Writer

Do you always check your work for repeated or overused words or phrases? I know I don't. Sometimes I can be so close to my writing that I don't notice when I've used a certain word too many times in the space of 3 or so paragraphs. In my mind, it sounds natural.

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When the Words Won't Come: Word Explorer

by ProWritingAid Jun 06, 2017

When the Words Won't Come: Word Explorer

Use ProWritingAid's Word Explorer to look at any word 14 different ways. Yes, it's true. Here's the list of ways you can check out any given word:

  • Dictionary
  • Reverse Dictionary (this shows you words with your given word in their definition)
  • Thesaurus
  • Lists (lists of dated terms, ironic terms, often used terms)
  • Alliteration (adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and verbs with the same letter or sound at the beginning or adjacent to your given word)
  • Clichés (to help you avoid them)
  • Spelling (good to know if you write frequently in American, British, and Australian English)
  • Rhymes
  • Pronunciation
  • Collocations (adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and verbs that come before or after your given word)
  • Common Phrases (2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-word phrases using your given word)
  • Commonly Possessed By (words that can own your given word)
  • Anagrams (in case you need help)
  • Examples (From books and quotes using your given word)

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Are You Ignoring Your Best Ideas?

by Hannah Collins May 17, 2017

Are You Ignoring Your Best Ideas?

Bored by your own writing? You could be suffering from the toll of ignoring your best ideas. ‘But why on earth would I ignore an idea if it’s good?’, you’re wondering. The answer is that you probably don’t even know you’re doing it.

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Why a Fully Realized Villain is as Important as Your Protagonist

by Kathy Edens May 12, 2017

Why a Fully Realized Villain is as Important as Your Protagonist

Your antagonist can make the difference between a ho-hum novel and a break-out one.

A fully realized villain is someone who shows us parts of ourselves in his or her makeup. If you can connect in some human way with the antagonist, it's going to bring up all kinds of tension for readers.

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Growing The Writing Cooperative

by Stella J. McKenna May 11, 2017

Growing The Writing Cooperative

“The Coop” is more than just a Medium publication — it’s a community. And it’s growing.

The motto of The Writing Cooperative is, “Helping each other write better”. This phrase ultimately guides all that we do.

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A Letter from Roald Dahl: "Eschew All Those Beastly Adjectives."

by ProWritingAid May 03, 2017

A Letter from Roald Dahl: "Eschew All Those Beastly Adjectives."

When a student wrote to Roald Dahl in 1980 asking for help on his thesis, he received this rather curt letter in reply. We think it's wonderful.

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How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk)

by Samia Rahman Apr 04, 2017

How to Write the ‘Other’ (Without Being a Jerk) It was during a Guardian webchat last year that one of my favourite authors, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, offered no-nonsense words of advice to an aspiring writer that rather stopped me in my tracks. The commenter had asked how he, a middle-aged white man, should go about writing the story of a young Bengali girl, who belonged to a culture that he readily admitted was alien to his own. Chimamanda invited him to re-examine his motivation to write about something so unfamiliar and seemed to endorse the age-old adage that you should write what you know.

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How to Write Multiple Points of View

by Kathy Edens Apr 03, 2017

How to Write Multiple Points of View

When you’re starting a new story, determining POV is a very important choice. Writing from multiple POVs can be frustrating and confusing for readers if it’s not handled well, so you need to have a very good reason for using multiple POVs in your story.

That said, here are a few tips on how to craft a story using multiple POVs:

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Putting Your Writing Through Its Paces

by ProWritingAid Feb 27, 2017

Putting Your Writing Through Its Paces

Pacing is a lot like the throttle on a vehicle. There are times when driving that you need to move slowly, like through a city or in a school zone. Then there are times when you need to move a lot faster, like on the freeway. And there are times when you need to just coast along at a moderate speed.

The pacing in your novel is a writer’s tool to help you manage the speed and rhythm of your story. Sometimes you want fast action, just as other times, you need to slow things down and let the scene unfold.

It’s up to you to know when to use pacing. A lot of your pacing decisions will be based on your genre. If you’re writing an action story, it’s pretty fast-paced with exhilarating moments of danger mixed with adventure juxtaposed with quieter moments when your characters do some heavy thinking. If you’re writing an epic that spans over generations, it might move more slowly.

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