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Articles by Hannah Yang

Hannah is a speculative fiction writer who loves all things strange and surreal. She holds a BA from Yale University and lives in Colorado. When she’s not busy writing, you can find her painting watercolors, playing her ukulele, or hiking in the Rockies. Follow her work on hannahyang.com or on Twitter at @hannahxyang.

Affect vs Effect: Which Is Correct?

Affect vs Effect: Which Is Correct?

Affect is normally used as a verb, and effect is normally used as a noun. However, there are exceptions to this rule. Learn the difference between affect vs effect.

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Then vs Than: What's the Difference?

Then vs Than: What's the Difference?

How do you remember the difference between then vs than? Than with an A is used to talk about comparisons, while then with an E is used to talk about time and order.

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Using a Comma Before or After But

Using a Comma Before or After But

You should use a comma before but whenever you’re connecting two independent clauses. It’s much rarer to use a comma after but. Learn the grammar rules around when to use a comma before or after but.

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10 Grammatical Errors and How to Correct Them

10 Grammatical Errors and How to Correct Them

Even the most experienced writers sometimes make grammar mistakes. Learn about the top ten most common grammatical errors and how to fix them in your own writing.

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Sergeant or Sargent: What’s the Difference?

Sergeant or Sargent: What’s the Difference?

Learn how to spell sergeant or sargent, and what this word means. The correct spelling is sergeant, whether you're talking about the army or the police force.

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Adjectives That Start With L: List of 400 Words to Describe Someone

Adjectives That Start With L: List of 400 Words to Describe Someone

Here’s a list of over 400 descriptive adjectives that start with L that you can use in your writing.

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Attain vs Obtain: How to Use Each Correctly

Attain vs Obtain: How to Use Each Correctly

Attain means “to get an achievement,” while obtain means “to gain possession of something.” Learn the full difference between attain vs obtain, and how to use each word in your writing.

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Neither/Nor, Either/Or: How to Use Correctly

Neither/Nor, Either/Or: How to Use Correctly

We use either or to affirm each of two possibilities, and we use neither nor to negate them. Learn more about how to use these common correlative conjunctions.

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Is There Any or Are There Any: How to Use Correctly

Is There Any or Are There Any: How to Use Correctly

Whether you use "is there any" or "are there any" depends on the noun you’re talking about in the sentence. If it’s a plural noun, you should use the verb are, and if it’s a singular or uncountable noun, you should the verb use is.

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Words to Use in an Essay: 300 Essay Words

Words to Use in an Essay: 300 Essay Words

It’s not easy to write an academic essay. Learn some words and phrases you can use to strengthen the introduction, body, and conclusion of your essays.

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Who vs. Whom: How to Use Them Correctly

Who vs. Whom: How to Use Them Correctly

Who vs. whom: which is correct? You should use "who" to refer to the subject of a sentence, and "whom" to refer to the object of a sentence.

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What Does STG Mean and Stand For?

What Does STG Mean and Stand For?

Most commonly, STG stands for “Swear to God.” Learn more about what this initialism means and how to use it.

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Incase or In Case: One Word or Two?

Incase or In Case: One Word or Two?

The correct spelling is in case. Incase isn’t a real word, it’s just a misspelling of the verb encase or the phrase in case. Learn more about incase or in case.

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Oxymoron vs Paradox: What's the Difference?

Oxymoron vs Paradox: What's the Difference?

A paradox refers to a contradiction on a logical level, while an oxymoron refers to a contradiction on a semantic level. Learn how to use oxymoron vs paradox in your writing.

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Super vs Supper: What's the Difference?

Super vs Supper: What's the Difference?

What is the difference between super vs supper? Super is usually an adjective that means “of excellent quality” or an adverb that means “extremely,” while supper is a noun that refers to an evening meal.

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