Why You Need Great Transitions in Your Writing

The ProWritingAid Team
ProWritingAid: A grammar guru, style editor, and writing mentor in one package.
Published Dec 23, 2015

Why You Should Use Transitions in Your Writing

Imagine a road with no street signs to point the way. How would you follow the right route if you didn’t have a sign showing you which way to go?

Transition words are the road signs in writing. And great transitions help your reader follow your train of thought without becoming bogged down trying to discern your meaning. Words and phrases like “similarly”, “nevertheless”, “in order to”, “likewise”, “as a result”, show the relationships between your ideas and can help illustrate agreement, contrast or show cause and effect.

Example 1

Take the following two sentences. Which one reads more fluidly?

Mark avoided the campus dining hall where his ex-friends hung out. He didn’t like its food.

Mark avoided the campus dining hall where his ex-friends hung out. Equally important, he didn’t like its food.

In the second example, you understand that the two thoughts are both important and related. Mark is equally avoiding seeing these people who used to be his friends and the food that he doesn’t like.

Example 2

Mindy thought her mother was over-reacting to her predicament. She waited two days after the first phone call to visit.

Mindy thought her mother was over-reacting to her predicament. Because of this, she waited two days after the first phone call to visit.

The use of “Because of this” in the second sentence makes clear to the reader that the gap in time between the call and the visit was a direct result of the over-reaction.

Example 3

The boy kicked the ball into the street. A speeding car came around the corner.

The boy kicked the ball into the street. At the same moment, a speeding car came around the corner.

Now we see the action in a wider lens: the ball goes into the street just as a car comes careening around the corner. The first illustration is short and choppy. It doesn’t flow well. The second sentence with a transition leads you smoothly between two related, but different thoughts.

The ProWritingAid Transitions Report will scan your writing and give you a “transitions score”, which is based on the percentage of sentences that contain a transition. We recommend that you aim for a score of 25% or higher, which means that you use at least one transition word or phrase every four sentences.

To conclude, great transitions lead to more sophisticated structure. (See what I did there with a transition?!)

Happy writing!

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The ProWritingAid Team
ProWritingAid: A grammar guru, style editor, and writing mentor in one package.

The most successful people in the world have coaches. Whatever your level of writing, ProWritingAid will help you achieve new heights. Exceptional writing depends on much more than just correct grammar. You need an editing tool that also highlights style issues and compares your writing to the best writers in your genre. ProWritingAid helps you find the best way to express your ideas.

By 19.doerdi.85 on 30 December 2015, 02:23 AM